Topographies of Hellenism: Mapping the Homeland

By Artemis Leontis | Go to book overview

Acknowledgments

This book was written between 1987 and 1993 while I was studying and teaching in Classics, Comparative Studies, and Modern Greek at the Ohio State University. Earlier versions of portions of the text have appeared elsewhere: parts of Chapter 3 in the Journal of Modern Greek Studies 8; Chapter 5 in the Journal of Modern Greek Studies 5 and in Homer, edited by Katherine King ( New York and London: Garland Press, 1994); and Chapter 6 in the Journal of Modern Greek Studies 9. I thank Johns Hopkins University Press for permission to reprint material that appeared in the Journal of Modern Greek Studies.

The book has as long a prehistory as any. It saw me through graduate training, during which time I benefited from studies with Eugene W. Holland, Stephen V. Tracy, and Marilyn Robinson Waldman, as well as the administrative support of Charles Babcock, Frederic Cadora, and Micheal Riley. To Gregory Jusdanis I owe special thanks, for he cultivated an interpretive community of young scholars, invested it with his integrity and enthusiasm, and encouraged its members to share work. In part as a result of his efforts, I found myself caught in a powerful new wave of Neohellenists. Panayotis Bosnakis, Vangelis Calotychos, Van Gegas, Stathis Gourgouris, Martha Klironomos, Eva Konstantellou, Tracy Lord, Nenny Panourgia, and Maria Papacostaki all responded to ideas found in this book.

As the book took shape, many colleagues helped me develop my thoughts, improve the manuscript, and find a home for it. Margaret Alexiou gave me topos. Eleni Vakalo and Nanos Valaoritis surveyed it. Khachig Tolölyan recalled its diasporas. Charles Williams reversed

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