Underground Harmonies: Music and Politics in the Subways of New York

By Susie J. Tanenbaum | Go to book overview

Bibliography

BOOKS AND ESSAYS

Bergreen, Laurence. As Thousands Cheer: The Life of Irving Berlin. New York: Viking Press, 1990.

Berman, Marshall. Take It to the Streets: Conflict and Community in Public Space. Dissent 33 (Fall 1986): 476-85.

Boyle, Wickham. On the Streets: A Guide to New York City's Buskers. New York: Department of Cultural Affairs, 1978.

Briffault, Robert. The Troubadours. Bloomington: Indiana University Press, 1965. Translated from the original, Les troubadours et le sentiment romanesque. Paris: Les Editeurs du Chêne, 1948.

Brown, Michael K. Working the Street: Police Discretion and the Dilemmas of Reform. New York: Russell Sage Foundation, 1988.

Bryner, Gary C., and Dennis L. Thompson, eds. The Constitution and the Regulation of Society. Provo, Utah: Brigham Young University, 1988.

Campbell, Patricia J. Passing the Hat: Street Performers in America. New York: Delacorte Press, 1981.

Cantwell, Robert. Bluegrass Breakdown: The Making of the Old Southern Sound. Urbana: University of Illinois Press, 1984.

Castleman, Craig. Getting Up: Subway Graffiti in New York. Cambridge: MIT Press, 1982.

Chapple, Steve, and Reebee Garofalo. Rock 'n' Roll Is Here to Pay: The History and Politics of the Music Industry. Chicago: Nelson-Hall, 1977.

Chevigny, Paul. Gigs: Jazz and the Cabaret Laws in New York City. New York: Routledge, Chapman, and Hall, 1991.

City Lore. I've Been Working on the Subway: The Folklore and Oral History of Transit. New York City Transit Museum, 1989.

Collier, James Lincoln. Louis Armstrong: An American Genius. New York: Oxford University Press, 1983.

Cudahy, Brian J. Under the Sidewalks of New York. Lexington, Mass.: Stephen Greene Press, 1988.

Cunningham, Joseph, and Leonard O. DeHart. A History of the New York City Subway System [microform]. New York: The authors, 1976.

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Underground Harmonies: Music and Politics in the Subways of New York
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page ii
  • Contents vii
  • Preface ix
  • Introduction - Venturing Down 1
  • Part 1 - Making Music Underground 9
  • 1 - Setting Up 11
  • 2 - The Beat Goes On: History 27
  • 3 - The Partners: Subway Musicians and Their Audiences 48
  • 4 - Boundaries and Bridges: Relationships in Public Space 97
  • Part II - Seeking Harmony Kunderground 123
  • 5 - Music under New York: Official Sponsorship 125
  • 6 - Sounds and Silence: Regulating Subway Music 148
  • 7 - Walking the Beat: Transit Police 170
  • 8 - Music on the Job: Subway Workers 185
  • 9 - Prospects for Change 209
  • Appendix 1 - Subway Homelessness 227
  • Appendix 2 - New York Street Music 234
  • Notes 241
  • Bibliography 255
  • Index 263
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