Narcodiplomacy: Exporting the U.S. War on Drugs

By H. Richard Friman | Go to book overview

PREFACE

While the world was greeting the end of the Cold War with euphoria, a war of much longer duration continued unabated. It appears that the twentieth century will end as it began, with the United States at battle against the international drug trade. The U.S. campaign against cocaine and heroin in the 1990s follows campaigns against cocaine in the 1980s, heroin and marijuana in the 1970s, marijuana in the 1960s, heroin and opium in the 1950s and 1940s, alcohol during the 1920s and early 1930s, and cocaine, opium, and manufactured narcotics from the early 1900s to the late 1930s. Through all this time, U.S. officials have seen illicit trafficking in drugs of abuse and addiction as a global problem with negative social, economic, and political consequences. Yet, U.S. efforts to win the support of other countries for the American agenda have met with highly inconsistent responses. This book explores why foreign compliance has been so unreliable.

In the United States foreign compliance with U.S. drug control efforts has often been linked to state capacity, that is, to the ability of a given state to meet the requirements involved. Lack of capacity expresses itself in two main ways: involuntary and voluntary failure to comply. 1 Thus, government officials may make good-faith pledges to carry out drug control measures but be prevented by weak state capacity from actually doing so. Or policy makers, recognizing

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Narcodiplomacy: Exporting the U.S. War on Drugs
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Narcodiplomacy - Exporting the U.S. War on Drugs *
  • Contents v
  • Tables vii
  • Preface ix
  • 1 - The Dynamics of Defection 1
  • 2 - Germany and the Cocaine Connection 15
  • 3 - Narcotics Trafficking and Japan 35
  • 4 - Japan and the Global Partnership 63
  • 5 - Germany and the American Agenda 87
  • 6 - Capacity and Compliance 113
  • Notes 119
  • Index 165
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