The Battle of the Books: History and Literature in the Augustan Age

By Joseph M. Levine | Go to book overview

Chapter Four
The Querelle

1

The battle of the books had gone too far to be concluded by satire, however brilliant. As we have seen, beneath the clash of personalities and the attacks ad hommem some real issues had appeared, and if they would not easily be resolved, they would not readily go away. Atterbury and his friends had welcomed the anonymous Tale of a Tub, although they worried a bit about its shafts at religion. Wotton saw his chance and struck back at once with a new and final edition of the Reflections ( 1705), in which he ridiculed Swift's orthodoxy -- and helped to provide a stumbling block to the cleric's advancement.1 In turn, Swift waited awhile but eventually brought out another edition of the Tale ( 1710), this time embellished with notes drawn from Wotton's works in a last ironic effort to turn the opposition into burlesque support.2 It was all part of the fun, no doubt, but hardly calculated to advance the argument; for that we must look elsewhere.

It would be misleading to suggest that the battle of the books proceeded in a more orderly or intelligible way than any military campaign. We have followed it enough to see that there was hardly a field of human endeavor that was untouched by the dispute, and indeed everywhere, from architecture to zoology, there was squabbling. At the risk of over

____________________
1
William Wotton, "Reflections upon Ancient and Modern Learning", To which is added A Defense thereof, in Answer to the Objections of Sir W. Temple, and Others. With Observations upon the Tale of a Tub, 3d ed. ( London, 1705); Jonathan Swift, A Tale of a Tub. . . with the Author's Apology and Explanatory Notes, 5th ed. ( London, 1710).
2
See below, chap. 12. By this time Swift had become intimate with the whole Christ Church crowd; see H. C. Beeching, Francis Atterbury ( London, 1909), pp. 233-34; Jonathan Swift , Journal to Stella, Mar. 15, 1712, in his Works, ed. Temple Scott, 12 vols. ( London, 1997-1908), 2:354-55.

-121-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
The Battle of the Books: History and Literature in the Augustan Age
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents vii
  • Illustrations xi
  • Acknowledgments xiii
  • Introduction 1
  • Part One - Literature 11
  • Chapter One - Wotton Vs. Temple 13
  • Chapter Two - Bentley Vs. Christ Church 47
  • Chapter Three - Stroke and Counterstroke 85
  • Chapter Four - The Querelle 121
  • Chapter Five - Ancient Greece and Modern Scholarship 148
  • Chapter Six - Pope's Iliad 181
  • Chapter Seven - Pope and the Quarrel between the Ancients and the Moderns 218
  • Chapter Eight - Bentley's Milton 245
  • Part Two - History 265
  • Chapter Nine - History and Theory 267
  • Chapter Ten - Ancients 291
  • Chapter Eleven - Moderns 327
  • Chapter Twelve - Ancients and Moderns 374
  • Conclusion 414
  • Index 419
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 428

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.