Research Methods in Education

By Louis Cohen; Lawrence Manion et al. | Go to book overview

Boxes
1.1 The subjective—objective dimension 7
1.2 Alternative bases for interpreting social reality 9
1.3 The functions of science 11
1.4 The hypothesis 15
1.5 Stages in the development of a science 16
1.6 An eight-stage model of the scientific method 16
1.7 A classroom episode 21
1.8 Differing approaches to the study of behaviour 35
2.1 The costs/benefits ratio 50
2.2 Guidelines for reasonably informed consent 51
2.3 Close encounters of a researcher kind 54
2.4 Conditions and guarantees proffered for a school-based research project 56
2.5 Negotiating access checklist 57
2.6 Absolute ethical principles in social research 58
2.7 An extreme case of deception 64
2.8 Ethical principles for the guidance of action researchers 68
2.9 An ethical code: an illustration 71
3.1 Elements of research styles 78
3.2 Statistics available for different types of data 81
3.3 A matrix for planning research 83
3.4 A planning sequence for research 89
3.5 A planning matrix for research 90
4.1 Determining the size of a random sample 94
4.2 Sample size, confidence levels and sampling error 95
4.3 Distribution of sample means showing the spread of a selection of sample means around the population mean 96
5.1 Principal sources of bias in life history research 133
7.1 Some historical interrelations between men, movements and institutions 159
7.2 A typology of life histories and their modes of presentation 166
8.1 Stages in the planning of a survey 170
8.2 Types of developmental research 175
8.3 Advantages of cohort over cross-sectional designs 177
8.4 The characteristics, strengths and weaknesses of longitudinal, cross-sectional, trend analysis, and retrospective longitudinal studies 178
9.1 Possible advantages of case study 184
9.2 Nisbet and Watt’s (1984) strengths and weaknesses of case study 184
9.3 A typology of observation studies 186
9.4 The case study and problems of selection 189
9.5 Continua of data collection, types and analysis in case study research 190
10.1 Common measures of relationship 192
10.2 Correlation scatter diagrams 194
10.3 A line diagram to indicate curvilinearity 198
10.4 Visualization of correlation of 0.65 between reading grade and arithmetic grade 201
10.5 Correlations between the various estimates of academic rank 203
12.1 The effects of randomization 214
12.2 The ABAB design 220
12.3 An ABAB design in an educational setting 221
12.4 Class size and learning in well-controlled and poorly controlled studies 225
13.1 Action research in classroom and school 234
13.2 A model of emancipatory action research for organizational change 236

-xi-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Research Methods in Education
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents vii
  • Boxes xi
  • Acknowledgements xiii
  • Introduction xv
  • Part One - The Context of Educational Research 1
  • 1 - The Nature of Inquiry 3
  • Part Two - Planning Educational Research 47
  • 2 - The Ethics of Educational and Social Research 49
  • 3 - Research Design Issues- Planning Research 73
  • 4 - Sampling 92
  • 5 - Validity and Reliability 105
  • Part Three - Styles of Educational Research 135
  • 6 - Naturalistic and Ethnographic Research 137
  • 7 - Historical Research 158
  • 8 - Surveys, Longitudinal, Cross-Sectional and Trend Studies 169
  • 9 - Case Studies 181
  • 10 - Correlational Research 191
  • 11 - Ex Post Facto Research 205
  • 12 - Experiments, Quasi-Experiments and Single-Case Research 211
  • 13 - Action Research 226
  • Part Four - Strategies for Data Collection and Researching 243
  • 14 - Questionnaires 245
  • 15 - Interviews 267
  • 16 - Accounts 293
  • 17 - Observation 305
  • 18 - Tests 317
  • 19 - Personal Constructs 337
  • 20 - Multi-Dimensional Measurement 349
  • 21 - Role-Playing 370
  • Part Five - Recent Developments in Educational Research 381
  • 22 - Recent Developments 383
  • Notes 396
  • Bibliography 407
  • Index 438
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 446

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.