Post-Olympism? Questioning Sport in the Twenty-First Century

By John Bale; Mette Krogh Christensen | Go to book overview

Notes on Contributors

John Bale teaches and researches at Aarhus University, Denmark and Keele University, UK. He has been a visiting professor at the University of Jyväskylä, Finland, the University of Western Ontario, Canada, and the University of Queensland, Australia. His most recent books are Imagined Olympians (University of Minnesota Press, 2002) and Running Cultures (Frank Cass, 2004). He has also edited (with Mike Cronin) Sport and Postcolonialism (Berg, 2003).

Douglas Booth is a professor at Waikato University, New Zealand and teaches courses on the history of sport. He is the author of The Race Game: Sport and Politics in South Africa (1998) and Australian Beach Cultures: The History of Sun, Sand and Surf (2001). Professor Booth is currently undertaking research into knowledge and methods in the history of sport.

Douglas Brown is an assistant professor in the Faculty of Kinesiology at the University of Calgary. His research is both historical and ethnographic. He attempts to reorient the critical eyes of researchers and students on the physical experience of movement rather than merely the spectating experience. In the past, he has examined the aesthetic imperative that Pierre de Coubertin envisioned for modern sport and the Olympic Games. He also studies the culture of mountaineering in the Canadian Rocky Mountains.

Susan Brownell was a nationally ranked athlete in the US before winning a gold medal in the heptathlon at the 1986 Chinese National College Games, while studying at Beijing University. Her experiences are recounted in her book Training the Body for China: Sports in the Moral Order of the People's Republic (1995). She is an associate professor and Chair of the Department of Anthropology at the University of Missouri, St Louis.

Ben Carrington teaches sociology and cultural studies at the University of Brighton, England. He has edited (with Ian McDonald) ‘Race’, Sport and British Society (Taylor and Francis, 2001).

Richard Cashman is an Associate Professor in History and Director of the Centre for Olympic Studies at the University of New South Wales and is also the

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