Post-Olympism? Questioning Sport in the Twenty-First Century

By John Bale; Mette Krogh Christensen | Go to book overview

11
Sportive Nationalism and
Globalization
John Hoberman

Early Globalization and Olympic Sport

On 25 November 1892, at a meeting of the Union des Sports Athlétiques in Paris, Pierre de Coubertin, founder of the modern Olympic movement, declared: ‘Let us export our oarsmen, our runners, our fencers into other lands. That is the true Free Trade of the future, and the day it is introduced into Europe the cause of Peace will have received a new and strong ally’ (Anon., 1992, p. 198). This proposal to invent and implement a symbolic version of free trade on behalf of international relations reminds us that Coubertin's Olympic project remains among the most durable monuments of the early phase of what we may call modern globalization (Hoberman, 1995). The Olympic movement originated, in fact, in a fin-de-siècle world that anticipated our own age of globalization in important ways.

‘Perhaps the greatest myth about globalization’, Nicholas D. Kristof (1999) notes, ‘is that it is new’ (see also Stille, 2001). By the end of the nineteenth century, as Harold James points out, ‘the world was highly integrated economically, through mobility of capital, information, goods and people. Capital moved freely between states and continents. The movement of capital would not have been possible without improved mechanisms for spreading news and ideas’ (James, 2001, p. 10). The first era of globalization was made possible by steamship lines, free trade, foreign investment, low trade barriers and mass migration of labour at a time when passports were not required for international travel. Like the second era of globalization of the last decades of the twentieth century, this early version of globalization was made possible by technological breakthroughs such as telegraphic communication, which functioned as the Internet of its era. This was the global civilization that offered the Olympic movement the political and economic circumstances in which it could fulfill its unique international mission.

-177-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Post-Olympism? Questioning Sport in the Twenty-First Century
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 276

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.