Department of Defense Political Appointments: Positions and Process

By Cheryl Y. Marcum; Lauren R. Sager Weinstein et al. | Go to book overview

B.
DoD PAS Position Data Sources

As described elsewhere in this report, PAS positions exist in the OSD, the Department of the Army, the Department of the Navy, and the Department of the Air Force.

As part of this study, we sought to compile a full data set from July 1947 to May 1999. We recorded the dates that all OSD and military department PAS positions were established, retitled, and abolished plus the dates (by month) that all PAS positions were filled and vacant. This appendix identifies the data sources that met our requirements and were available to us.

We conducted a thorough search for PAS position and appointee data throughout the OSD, the military departments, the White House Personnel Office, the DMDC, and the Office of Personnel Management. The White House Personnel Office retains no PAS position or appointee data from previous administrations. The readily available data from DMDC and the Office of Personnel Management was aggregated in such a way that it was not suitable for answering the primary questions of interest.

The data sources we used identify various statutes, defense directives, memoranda, and sometimes just dates that established positions by title. Whenever available, the date listed for establishing, retitling, or abolishing positions is the statute date because “dates of Department of Defense directives confirming establishment of positions and prescribing functions usually follow appointments by months and sometimes years” (Office of the Secretary of Defense, 1995). For example, the Under Secretary of Defense (Policy) position was “officially established by Defense Directive 5111.1, October 27, 1978, pursuant to PL 95–140, October 21, 1977[,]” and was first filled August 14, 1978. Therefore, we were not always able to reliably measure the time between the date the position was established and the date the position was filled or retitled. However, the confirmation and resignation dates of appointees are reliable.


Sources for OSD PAS Position and Appointee Data

The primary data source for empirical position data was Department of Defense Key Officials, 1947–1995 (1995). It summarizes changes to OSD PAS positions resulting from changes to statutes and identifies the dates when most—not all— OSD PAS positions were established and abolished. It also lists by position title the names, confirmation date, and resignation date of every individual who

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Department of Defense Political Appointments: Positions and Process
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page *
  • Preface iii
  • Contents v
  • Figures vii
  • Tables ix
  • Summary xi
  • Acknowledgments xvii
  • Acronyms xix
  • 1 - Introduction 1
  • 2 - Trends in DOD Political Appointees 3
  • 3 - The Appointment Process and Rules Governing Political Appointees 19
  • 4 - Conclusion 41
  • A - An Overview of the Federal Workforce System 45
  • B - DOD Pas Position Data Sources 49
  • C - Pas Position Titles in Osd from 1947 to 1999 by Function 53
  • D - Chronology of Pas Positions Assigned to Osd Functional Areas 69
  • E - Authorized Osd Pas Positions by Function (May 31, 1999) 71
  • References 73
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