Party Elites in Divided Societies: Political Parties in Consociational Democracy

By Kurt Richard Luther; Kris Deschouwer | Go to book overview

Editors’ preface

Political parties and consociational democracy are subjects which we have both been researching for some considerable time. Over the course of a number of discussions about our separate work on these matters, as they pertain to Austria and to Belgium, we found we shared a number of empirical and theoretical interests. Moreover, we also quickly established that we were both equally frustrated by the fact that the consociational and party literatures had not yet been brought together and applied in a truly comparative perspective. Rather than continuing merely to bemoan that situation, we decided to collaborate to try to fill that gap in the existing literature.

We used as our point of departure ideas contained in a 1992 special issue of the journal West European Politics (vol. 15, no. 1) devoted to whether Austria was’Still a Case of Consociationalism’. It was co-edited by one of us, who also contributed a lengthy article structured around an analytical framework specifically developed to assess change in the role which political parties perform both within and between the traditionally fragmented subcultures of Austrian consociational democracy during and since the period of ‘classic consociationalism’. In 1995, we used that framework to organize an ECPR workshop on ‘Consociationalism, Parties and Party Systems’, which we co-directed at the Institut d’etudes politiques de Bordeaux. We had an intellectually stimulating week, made all the more enjoyable by IEP’s proximity to some of Europe’s best vineyards! A central theme of our discussions was the extent to which an approach developed to analyse the Austrian case could serve as the basis of a comparative study of the role of political parties in a range of consociational democracies. By the end of the week it was clear to us that it could, and a number of our fellow participants resolved to join us in a project that would seek to apply it both via case studies of individual consociational democracies and in thematic contributions.

The outcome of our endeavour is contained in this volume. Though it has taken longer than originally planned for the book to appear, we are very pleased that its publication will now coincide with the thirtieth anniversary of the birth of consociational theory. The analytical framework underpinning this volume constitutes a novel combination of Lijphart’s original model of consociational democracy and the insights of some of the most recent literature on political parties. We hope that it has not only enabled us to provide a detailed assessment

-xvii-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Party Elites in Divided Societies: Political Parties in Consociational Democracy
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 292

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.