Party Elites in Divided Societies: Political Parties in Consociational Democracy

By Kurt Richard Luther; Kris Deschouwer | Go to book overview

3

Must what goes up always come down?

Of pillars and arches in Austria’s political architecture

Kurt Richard Luther

Introduction

In essence, the consociational model seeks to elucidate two aspects of the political architecture of democracies with deeply divided societies. The first relates to the political sociology of these societies, which the model characterises as comprising vertically encapsulated and mutually hostile political subcultures (or ‘pillars’). The second focus of the model is upon the accommodating behaviour of the subcultural political elites, whose co-operation provides a metaphorical ‘arch’, which spans the divide between the pillars and thus helps ensure the political system’s stability. The introductory chapter to this volume spells out the framework for the analysis of parties and party systems in consociational democracies which the author has deduced from Lijphart’s initial model. The aim of this chapter is to use the Austrian case to test the value of that framework. 1

The next section of this chapter will examine the role which Austria’s pillar parties have played within their respective subcultures, or ‘Lager’2 This will be done by first identifying the main characteristics of pillar party organisation and behaviour during the period from 1945-66, when the country was widely held to exhibit both pillarized segmentation and elite accommodation (Secher 1958; Engelmann 1966; Lehmbruch 1967a; Pulzer 1969; Powell 1970; Engelmann and Schwarz 1974a; Stiefbold 1974a and 1974b; Houska 1985). Second, we will consider changes in these aspects since this period of ‘classic’ consociationalism (Luther and Müller 1992b:10). Similarly, the third section of this chapter will use the author’s framework to assess the extent of change since the 1960s in the overarching accommodation between the party political elite of the rival subcultures. This will be done by means of a consecutive analysis of the ‘format’ and ‘mechanics’ (Sartori 1976:128f) of party interaction in the five main arenas of party competition.

Throughout, the main focus will be upon Austria’s three traditional Lager parties: the Sozialistische (since 1991 Sozialdemokratische) Partei Österreichs, or SPÖ, the Östemichische Volkspartei, or ÖVP and the Freiheitliche Partei Österreichs, or FPÖ. It is the first two of these that have in Austria constituted what the opening chapter of this volume has referred to as ‘pillar parties’, or as the parties ‘playing the

-43-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Party Elites in Divided Societies: Political Parties in Consociational Democracy
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 292

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.