Transnational Crime in the Americas: An Inter-American Dialogue Book

By Tom Farer | Go to book overview

10

BAD BUSINESS: A COMMENTARY ON THE CRIMINOLOGY OF ORGANIZED CRIME IN THE UNITED STATES

Alan A. Block

In his room, Latimer sat down by the window and gazed out across the black river to the lights which it reflected and the faint glow in the sky beyond the Louvre. His mind was haunted by the past, by the confession of Dhris, the Negro, and by the memories of Irana Preveza, by the tragedy of Bulic and by a tale of white crystals travelling west to Paris, bringing money to the fig-picker of Izmir. Three human beings had died horribly that Dimitrious might take his ease. If there were such a thing as Evil, then this man….

But it was useless to try to explain him in terms of Good and Evil. They were no more than baroque abstractions. Good Business and Bad Business were the elements of the new theology.

—Eric Ambler, A Coffin for Dimitrious


INTRODUCTION

Up until quite recently the majority of American criminological studies of organized crime was fixated on defining the phenomenon without considering it as phenomena. 1 For decades mainstream organized crime research took its cue from government needs and perceptions, concentrating on Italian American criminals to the exclusion of other organized criminals. The prevailing paradigm was that they were organized crime, others were affiliates or associates of organized crime, or indeed something else. They were the mob or the “outfit” or the mafia or La Cosa Nostra. They controlled the most important illicit activities as well as non-Italian American criminals of significance. And to some extent, in the decades following WW II, that was true, and particularly in those American cities with a large Italian American population. The mob or La Cosa Nostra was deeply embedded in the politics of certain American cities and some states, and in trade unions such as the Teamsters, the East Coast longshoremen, and the building trades. 2 With access to union pension funds, mobsters and their friends in law, accounting, and politics had a field day in private real estate development.

-217-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Transnational Crime in the Americas: An Inter-American Dialogue Book
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 314

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.