Work, Change, and Competition: Managing for Bass

By David Preece; Gordon Steven et al. | Go to book overview

8

Managers and change

Introduction

So far we have described the change programme mainly from the point of view of those who determined the change strategy, or of those whose responsibility it was to implement the programme. In this chapter we describe and evaluate the reception the changes received from the operational managers of Bass Taverns, especially the LHMs and RBMs. In particular, we examine the consequences, both intended and unintended, of the technological changes, the implementation of the new contractual relationship in the ‘New Deal’, the introduction of ‘new ways of working’ (including working in teams), and finally the impact all this had upon roles, attitudes and relationships within the company. To some degree, the roles and relationships flowed from the new organizational forms, but, of course, people create and sometimes change organizations and modes of working through their own preferences and actions, and this can mean that the structures and procedures determined by others (such as senior managers and consultants) do not always operate in the way intended; we therefore look in some detail at this attitudinal and behavioural activity as it manifested itself at the time. In addition to examining the impact of and reception given to the change programme by LHMs and RBMs, we also draw upon our primary data from other managers for this purpose, which covers BAs, SBAs, RDs, Board members and other senior managers and specialists (this latter group includes Change Team members, as, of course, those who initiate and help implement change are not exempt from its effects). A particular concern of the chapter, which overlays much of the discussion referred to above, is to determine whether or not any change took place in power and authority relationships within the company as a result of the change programme. It is in this chapter, then, that we make extensive use of our survey, focus group and interview data. The chapter concludes with a consideration of research agendas and an overview of the impact of the change programme on the career aspirations of managerial employees.


Change and senior management

If the incumbents of senior operations management positions prior to the launch of the change programme and NRI are compared to those remaining in such

-139-

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Work, Change, and Competition: Managing for Bass
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents vii
  • Figures x
  • Tables xii
  • Acknowledgements xiii
  • Glossary xiv
  • 1 - Introduction 1
  • 2 - The Changing Nature of Public House Retailing 9
  • 3 - Bass PLC 27
  • 4 - Management and Managing 50
  • 5 - Change and Changing 67
  • 6 - The Emergence of a Change Strategy in Bass Taverns 89
  • 7 - Changing the Organization 117
  • 8 - Managers and Change 139
  • 9 - Performance Assessment of the Change Programme 188
  • 10 - Conclusion 196
  • Bibliography 217
  • Index 225
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