The Monroe Doctrine: Also, Jefferson's Letter to Monroe

By James Monroe; Thomas Jefferson | Go to book overview

There is an important subject pertaining to Monroe's administration which is indissolubly associated with his name. It is an announcement of the policy of the United States in respect to foreign interference in the affairs of this continent. This announcement bears the name of the "Monroe Doctrine", as such it is discussed in books on public law and in general histories. It is commonly regarded as an epitome of the principles of the United States with respect to its attitude toward all the American States in their political relations to the rest of the world. The Monroe Doctrine is embodied in Monroe's message to Congress December 2, 1823. The two passages which relate to foreign interference were separated by the introduction of other matters. The parts of the message which have come to be regarded as the "Monroe Doctrine" are as follows:


THE MONROE DOCTRINE

AT the proposal of the Russian imperial government, made through the minister of the emperor residing here, a full power and instructions have been transmitted to the minister of the United States at St. Petersburg, to arrange, by amicable negotiation, the respective rights and interests of the two nations on the northwest coast of this continent. A similar proposal has been made by his imperial majesty to the government of Great Britain, which has likewise been acceded to. The government of the United States has been desirous, by this friendly proceeding, of manifesting the great value which they have invariably attached to the friendship of the emperor, and their solicitude to cultivate the best understanding with his government. In the discussions to which this interest has given rise and in the arrangements by which they may terminate, the occasion has been judged proper for asserting, as a principle in which the rights and interests of the United States are involved, that the American continents, by the free and independent condition which they have assumed and maintain, are henceforth not to be considered as subjects for future colonization by any European powers."

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The Monroe Doctrine: Also, Jefferson's Letter to Monroe
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  • The Monroe Doctrine 1
  • Jefferson's Letter to Monroe 4
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