Anthropology and Psychoanalysis: An Encounter through Culture

By Suzette Heald; Ariane Deluz | Go to book overview

14

Psychoanalysis as content

Reflections on Chapters 11, 12 and 13

R.H. Hook

It was suggested in Chapter 7 that it might be useful to distinguish between the process of psychoanalysis and its other aspects, there summarily labelled ‘content’, without any attempt to characterise content, though content would have to include at least some account of what people think, feel and do, how they behave and respond: the findings of psychoanalysis. Another aspect of psychoanalysis would have to do with formulations about the ‘structure’ of the mind, metapsychology, allied inevitably to its metaphysics, i.e., its ontology and epistemology. These three aspects of psychoanalysis, process, content and structure, will be found to be interrelated but in what way they are interrelated is beyond the scope of this paper.

Obviously a great deal has been known about human responses and behaviour and for a very long time, though what is known may be repeatedly lost: denied, repressed, forgotten or simply ignored, only to be rediscovered at a later time. I am referring of course to what great thinkers, writers and artists have known about and dealt with. Freud himself quoted extensively from the work of earlier writers and artists. The list in James Strachey’s Standard Edition of the ‘works of painting and sculpture, music, drama, poetry, fiction, as well as some myths, legends and fairy tales’ quoted or discussed by Freud runs to over seven pages and contains several hundred entries (S.E. 24:187-94). Such material would not have been so ready to hand had not the ‘content’ of the mind already been largely known and also common property. Lévi-Strauss makes essentially the same point:

At every step, or almost every step, we met notions and categories, in perfectly explicit form—such as those of the oral and anal character—which psychoanalysts cannot claim to have discovered: they have done no more than rediscover them.

Better still, Totem and Taboo complete was anticipated in a significant advance by the Jivaro Indians in the myth which for them takes the place of Genesis…. From a psychological perspective the plot of the

-225-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Anthropology and Psychoanalysis: An Encounter through Culture
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents v
  • Preface xi
  • 1 - Introduction 1
  • Part I - Complementarity 27
  • 2 - Interpreting the Implicit 29
  • Bibliography 39
  • 3 - Incestuous Fantasy and Kinship among the Guro 40
  • Bibliography 53
  • 4 - Islam, Symbolic Hegemony and the Problem of Bodily Expression 54
  • Bibliography 69
  • 5 - Trauma and Ego-Syntonic Response 70
  • Part II - The Analysis of Dreams 97
  • 6 - Dream Imagery Becomes Social Experience 99
  • Bibliography 112
  • 7 - Psychoanalysis, Unconscious Phantasy and Interpretation 114
  • Part III - The Lacanian Perspective 129
  • 8 - Gendered Persons 131
  • Notes 149
  • 9 - Lacanian Ethnopsychoanalysis 153
  • Bibliography 161
  • 10 - Lacan and Anthropology 163
  • Part IV - Working Models 169
  • 11 - Indulgent Fathers and Collective Male Violence 171
  • 12 - Every Man a Hero 184
  • Bibliography 208
  • 13 - Symbolic Homosexuality and Cultural Theory 210
  • Note 223
  • 14 - Psychoanalysis as Content 225
  • Index 239
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 244

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.