The Industrial Revolution and the Atlantic Economy: Selected Essays

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gold flow over United States borders…is predominantly caused by income movements and excess demand for real-money balances.’


REFERENCES

a
Abramovitz, M. (1959) ‘Historical and comparative rates of production, productivity and prices’, Hearings before Joint Economic Committee, 86th Congress, 1st Session, Pt. 2, Washington, D.C., 1959:411-66.
——(1961) ‘The nature and significance of Kuznets cycles’, Economic Development and Cultural Change 9(3): 225-48, University of Chicago.
——(1964) ‘Evidences of long swings in aggregate construction since the Civil War’, Occasional Paper 90, New York: National Bureau of Economic Research: Columbia University Press.
——(1968) ‘The passing of the Kuznets cycle’, Economica 35:349-67.

b
Beach, W.E. (1935) British International Gold Movements and Banking Policy, 1881-1913, Cambridge, MA: Harvard University Press: 122-36.
Bernstein, E.M. (1963) ‘The post war trend cycle in the United States’, Quarterly Review (1st quarter), New York: Model Roland and Co.: 1-10.
Bloomfield, A.I. (1968) Patterns of Fluctuation in International Investment before 1914, Studies in International Finance No. 21, Princeton, NJ: International Finance Section, Princeton University Press: 18-24.

c
Cagan, P. (1965) Determinants and Effects of Changes in the Stock of Money 1875-1960, New York: National Bureau of Economic Research, Columbia University Press.

f
Fabricant, S. (1959) Basic Facts on Productivity Change, Occasional Paper 63, New York: National Bureau of Economic Research: 16-17.
Feinstein, C.H. (1961) ‘Income and investment in the United Kingdom, 1856-1941’, Economic Journal 71:367-85.
Ford, A.G. (1962) The Gold Standard 1880-1914: Britain and Argentina, London and New York: Oxford University Press: Ch. 8.
——(1971) ‘British investment in Argentina and long swings, 1880-1914’, Journal of Economic History 31:650-63.
Friedman, M. and Schwartz, A.J. (1963) A Monetary History of the United States, 1867-1960, Princeton, NJ: National Bureau of Economic Research, Princeton University Press.

g
Gallman, R.E. (1966) ‘Gross national product in the United States, 1834-1909’, in Output Employment and Productivity in the United States after 1800, Studies in Income and Wealth by the Conference on Research in Income and Wealth, New York: National Bureau of Economic Research, Columbia University Press: vol. 30:15.

h
Hickman, B.G. (1963) ‘The post war retardation: Another long swing in the rate of growth?’ American Economic Review 53:490-507.

i
Imlah, A.H. (1958) Economic Elements in the Pax Britannica, Cambridge, MA: Harvard University Press: 96-8.

j
Johnson, H.G. (1958) ‘The transfer problem and exchange stability’, in

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