East-West Arms Control: Challenges for the Western Alliance

By David Dewitt; Hans Rattinger | Go to book overview

Introduction

Any book today on East-West arms control can be guaranteed to have been superseded by events prior to publication. Actions by political, diplomatic, military and financial leaders now seem often to run contrary to the expectations established by post-war European and North Atlantic experience. Important aspects of East-West relations have changed irrevocably, with results which are as profound as they are uncertain.

The essays in this volume illustrate the challenges and problems facing analysts in such an environment. Drafted for a conference on Canadian and German perspectives of European arms control held in Toronto, Canada, in the spring of 1988, the essays were revised over the ensuing year. The rapidity of policy developments and of changes in the security milieu, as well as the inconclusiveness of the ongoing arms control negotiations, hindered our ability to engage in constant revision. Rather, a single concluding essay is offered which, among other things, bridges the period through the summer of 1990. These chapters are valuable in providing a critical perspective on arms control issues immediately prior to the dramatic developments in Eastern Europe. They constitute a useful analysis and retrospective on where we were, and much insight into where we might be heading.

It is useful to recall that this is not the first phase of superpower détente and arms control efforts in post-war history. Almost 20 years ago, we entered into a period of so-called détente. Then the United States was on the defensive over Vietnam, a situation which eroded confidence in American leadership, while the Soviet Union, in its rise to strategic parity, challenged American global hegemony. From the late 1970s through much of the past decade, the Soviet Union was on the defensive, both externally regarding Afghanistan and the unravelling of the Warsaw Pact, and internally with its

-xi-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
East-West Arms Control: Challenges for the Western Alliance
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 310

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.