Lewd Women and Wicked Witches: A Study of the Dynamics of Male Domination

By Marianne Hester | Go to book overview

Notes

1 THE INTRODUCTION
1
Marx and Engels briefly mention this in The German Ideology (1968), and Engels takes it up in The Family, Private Property and the State (1968).

2 FROM MEN PARTIALLY TO MEN PRIMARILY RESPONSIBLE FOR WOMEN’S OPPRESSION
1
For discussion of the domestic labour debate see Hester 1988.
2
The term ‘dual systems’ originates from Iris Young (1980).
3
See Barrett (1984: Introduction) for an early overview, and Beechey (1986) for more recent material.
4
Cockburn is using a notion of ‘sex and gender’ here which is both interrelated and socially constructed. This is similar to my own preferred terminology; although Cockburn is referring specifically to the use of the term by Gayle Rubin (1975).
5
It should be noted that it is difficult to tell the actual extent of sexual violence, as women are often reluctant to report incidents. The apparent increase in the figures in recent years which Cockburn mentions may merely reflect greater numbers of recorded incidents (see London Rape Crisis Centre, undated; Hanmer and Saunders 1984). The area of sexual violence which does appear to have increased in recent years is the public availability of pornography (Walby 1990).
6
The recent equal pay legislation (Equal Pay Act 1975) has made the argument in favour of a ‘family wage’ for men more difficult, and has led to a contradiction between a family wage on the one hand and the notion of equal pay for both men and women on the other (Cockburn 1983:183). It should be noted, however, that equal pay, despite the legislation, is not a reality.
7
Other strategies such as wage differentials may achieve a similar purpose (see Walby 1986).
8
Nowhere is her use of term ‘structure’ explained, though it is implied that it refers to recurring patterns of social behaviour and relations. It

-205-

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