A Dictionary of Ancient Near Eastern Architecture

By Gwendolyn Leick | Go to book overview

J

jamb

The upright vertical face of a doorway which supports the lintel and protects the wall-opening. In Egyptian and Achaemenian monumental architecture, the whole door-frame could be built of stone (sometimes cut from a single block). Elsewhere, bricks or wood or a combination of both were in use. Jambs with figurative relief ornamentation, especially on important gateways, ensured the magical protection of the building or city. Pairs of human-headed colossal bulls or lions (see LAMASSU) flanked the gateways in Assyrian and Achaemenian palaces; the Hittites carved images of lions, warriors and sphinxes on their monolithic gates.

Jarmo

Mesopotamia, see map p. xviii. Neolithic farming-settlement (c. 6700-6000 BC). The twenty-five excavated houses had rectangular ground plans with a courtyard in the middle. The walls were built of PISÉ on stone foundations. The clay floors were laid over a bed of reeds. The roofs were probably pitched and covered with mudplastered reeds.

Braidwood, R.J., Antiquity 24 (1950) 189-195
Braidwood, R.J., Bulletin of the American Schools of Oriental Research 124 (1951) 12-18
Braidwood, R.J., Howe, B., Prehistoric Investigations in Iraqi Kurdistan (Chicago 1960)

Jericho (modern Tell es-Sultan)

Palestine, see map p. xix. This site had a very long sequence of habitation. It had a good position at the foot of hills, near clear water wells and lay on a frequented route along the Jordan Valley into the Judean Hills and the Dead Sea. The present stratigraphy was established by K. Kenyon.

The earliest Mesolithic levels (10th millennium BC) are associated with a population of hunters and food-gatherers living in simple hut-like shelters. The remains of one solid building, generally interpreted as a sanctuary, were found near the springs. It was a rectangular structure (3.50m×6.50m) with stone walls enforced by wooden posts. Three large stone blocks had holes bored right through them, perhaps in order to support some upright object of ritual significance.

The succeeding period (Proto-Neolithic; 9th millennium BC) marks the transition from a semi-nomadic, hunting way of life to a settled community based on agriculture. The impermanent huts became solid houses made of handshaped bricks, circular and semi-interred.

The settlement prospered and assumed urban character in the following Pre-Pottery Neolithic A period (8th millennium BC). A free-standing stone wall (1.98m wide) surrounded the town. One great circular watch-tower survived to a height of 9.14m. It was also built of stone (8.50m diameter) and had an internal staircase leading to the top.

The site was repopulated after a period of abandonment and the architectural

-105-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
A Dictionary of Ancient Near Eastern Architecture
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents vii
  • Illustrations ix
  • A 1
  • B 26
  • C 41
  • D 59
  • E 68
  • F 75
  • G 82
  • H 92
  • I 102
  • J 105
  • K 108
  • L 121
  • M 127
  • N 145
  • O 152
  • P 155
  • Q 172
  • R 173
  • S 181
  • T 199
  • U 229
  • V 238
  • W 241
  • Y 245
  • Z 246
  • Alphabetical List of Entries 249
  • Index 253
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 262

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.