The Kaiser's Army: The Politics of Military Technology in Germany during the Machine Age, 1870-1918

By Eric Dorn Brose | Go to book overview

ACKNOWLEDGMENTS

ASIX-YEAR PROJECT has generated more debts to helpful persons and institutions than can be named here. Thanks are due to the German Academic Exchange Service, which funded a large portion of the early research;Deans Thomas Canavan, Sam Bose, and Cecilie Goodrich at Drexel University, who facilitated a series of faculty development grants;and Provost Richard Astro of Drexel for his tolerance of a deparment head who still does research and writing. I have also received valuable assistance from the staffs of many repositories. Special thanks go to Drs. Tröger and Fuchs of the Kriegsarchiv in Munich;Dr. Trischler of the Deutsches Museum in Munich;Herr Dietze of the Military Historical Research Office in Potsdam;Dr. Fleischer of the Federal Military Archive in Freiburg; Fernando Acosta of the New York Public Library;and especially Deidre Harper and Peter Groesbeck of the Interlibrary Loan and Graphics departments, respectively, at Drexel. Three colleagues at Drexel, Walter High, Vivien Thweat, and Sidney Diggles, were always there when I needed them. For letters of recommendation and comments on the project, I am further indebted to Volker Berghahn, Dennis Showalter, and Williamson Murray. My final product was greatly strengthened, moreover, by the sound advice of Susan Ferber at Oxford University Press, as well as the numerous suggestions for revisions made by the external readers. Those who have helped me improve the manuscript are not responsible, of course, for the laws that no doubt remain. Finally, I want to thank my wife, Christine, for her inexhaustible patience during too many research trips to Germany. This book is dedicated to her.

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The Kaiser's Army: The Politics of Military Technology in Germany during the Machine Age, 1870-1918
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page *
  • Acknowledgments *
  • Contents *
  • The Kaiser's Army *
  • Introduction 3
  • Chapter 1 - Old Soldiers 7
  • Chapter 2 - Queen of the Battlefield 26
  • Chapter 3 - Between Persistence and Change 43
  • Chapter 4 - The Plans of Schlieffen 69
  • Chapter 5 - Past and Present Collide 85
  • Chapter 6 - No Frederick the Great 112
  • Chapter 7 - Toward the Great War 138
  • Chapter 8 - Rolling the Iron Dice 183
  • Chapter 9 - Denouement 226
  • Notes 241
  • Bibliography and Abbreviations 293
  • Index 305
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