Abandoning Dead Metaphors: The Caribbean Phase of Derek Walcott's Poetry

By Patricia Ismond | Go to book overview

Acknowledgments

Thanks are due to Derek Walcott and his publishers, Farrar, Straus and Giroux, and Faber and Faber, for quotes from Walcott's books and essays; to Wilson Harris and his publishers, for use of material from The Guyana Quartet, and to Caribbean Quarterly for quotes from Harris's “History, Fable and Myth”; to Professor Edward Baugh, for the use of some of his sources in Memory as Vision: Another Life; to Stewart Brown, editor of The Art of Derek Walcott, and his publisher for several references made to and quotes from that book; to Rei Terada and publisher, for use of material in her Derek Walcott's Poetry: American Mimicry, in my engagement with her critical perspective in that book; and to John Thieme and his publisher, for a similar use of material from his Derek Walcott; to Robert Hamner, for his quite comprehensive Walcott bibliography in Critical Perspectives on Derek Walcott, which proved invaluable. I am indebted to Walcott, again, and his family, for providing me with relevant background information over the years.

I am also grateful to the Stanford Humanities Center of Stanford University for the fellowship that enabled me to begin this work; and to the University of the West Indies, St Augustine, my workplace, for the sensitive response of its administration to the problems and setbacks that sometimes interrupted its progress.

I am especially happy to express my gratitude to the following persons who read the manuscript and contributed to its improvement in various ways: Professor Gordon Rohleher, my colleague and friend, who picked out the gaps in the manuscript in its early stages and gave generously of his breadth of knowledge; Professor Mervyn Morris, for his sensitive and most encouraging

-viii-

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Abandoning Dead Metaphors: The Caribbean Phase of Derek Walcott's Poetry
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents vii
  • Acknowledgments viii
  • Abbreviations x
  • Chapter One - The Caribbean Focus 1
  • Chapter Two - Juvenilia to in a Green Night 17
  • Chapter Three - The Castaway and the Gulf 43
  • Chapter Four - Revolutionary Creed, Race, Politics and Society 103
  • Chapter Five - Alter/native Metaphors in Fulfilment 140
  • Chapter Six - Towards Another Life 225
  • Notes 281
  • Bibliography 295
  • Index 304
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