North American Exploration - Vol. 1

By John Logan Allen | Go to book overview

Preface and Acknowledgments

The literature of the exploration and discovery of North America is massive, and with the recent upsurge of interest in exploration and the subsequent reeditions of explorers' journals and the publication of other works stimulated by the Columbian Quincentennial, it promises to become even more so. Why, then, is there a need for such an effort as that presented in the three volumes of North American Exploration, for another research project and publication dealing with the exploration of North America?

The best among many good answers to this question is quite simple: there has not been, since late in the nineteenth century, an undertaking of similar scope. Extremely valuable collections of original documentary materials have been compiled, explorers' journals have been reedited and reissued, and major interpretative works by single or small groups of scholars have been produced. But a collaborative, comprehensive study and overview devoted exclusively to the topic of North American exploration has not been undertaken. In this sense, the project that culminates in these three volumes is long overdue. The contributing authors whose works are presented in these volumes have, of necessity, written chapters that are partly synthetic--that is, they build upon existing erudition. But each of these chapters is also a work of original scholarship, bringing new perspectives and approaches to the story of the exploration of the North American continent. The authors have considered new approaches, explored new ideas and new facts, developed new questions, and newly examined previous works. They have written chapters that are both interpretative and synthesizing, accurate in detail of facts both spatial and temporal, and well-documented from both primary and secondary source materials. They have produced a body of scholarship that, in addition to its historical and geographical content, is replete with historiographical references to the literature of exploration, with commentary on the political and economic and social aspects of exploration and with analyses of the consequences of exploration for other human endeavors.

The editor has chosen to preserve British, Canadian, and American usages in spelling and form. We hope that this internationally flavored (or flavoured) North American Exploration will play a pivotal role in the scholarly

-xiii-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
North American Exploration - Vol. 1
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 540

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.