Characters of Shakespeare's Plays: and Lectures on the English Poets

By William Hazlitt | Go to book overview

Characters of
Shakespear's Plays
&
Lectures on
The English Poets

By William Hazlitt

MACMILLAN AND CO., LIMITED
ST. MARTIN'S STREET LONDON
1920

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Characters of Shakespeare's Plays: and Lectures on the English Poets
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Characters of Shakespear's Plays & Lectures on the English Poets *
  • Bibliographical Note *
  • Contents *
  • Preface to Characters of Shakespeare's Plays *
  • Characters of Shakespear's Plays *
  • Cymbeline *
  • Macbeth 10
  • Julius CÆsar 20
  • Othello 26
  • Timon of Athens 38
  • Coriolanus 42
  • Troilus and Cressida 51
  • Antony and Cleopatra 58
  • Hamlet 63
  • The Tempest 71
  • The Midsummer Night's Dream 78
  • Romeo and Juliet 83
  • Lear 94
  • Richard II 110
  • Henry IV - In Two Parts 117
  • Henry V 125
  • Henry VI - In Three Parts 133
  • Richard III 140
  • Henry VIII 146
  • King John 150
  • Twelfth Night; Or, What You Will 157
  • The Two Gentlemen of Verona 163
  • The Merchant of Venice 165
  • The Winter's Tale 171
  • All's Well That Ends Well 177
  • Love's Labour Lost 180
  • Much Ado About Nothing 183
  • As You like It 187
  • The Taming of the Shrew 191
  • Measure for Measure 195
  • The Merry Wives of Windsor 200
  • The Comedy of Errors 202
  • Doubtful Plays of Shakespear 204
  • Poems and Sonnets 211
  • Lectures on the English Poets *
  • Lecture I.—introductory *
  • Lecture II 239
  • Lecture III 268
  • Lecture IV 298
  • Lecture V 317
  • Lecture VI 340
  • Lecture VII 364
  • Lecture VIII 387
  • Index *
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