Encyclopedia of the History of Arabic Science

By Roshdi Rashed; Regis Morelon | Go to book overview

NOTES
1
On the astronomy of the Middle Ages before the arrival of Arabic science in the West, see the synthesis and study by Pedersen (1975).
2
The most recent study of the transmission of Arabic science to the Latin world, with an extensive bibliography, is by Vernet (1985). Despite its age, Haskins (1927) remains useful. See also Carmody (1956).
3
On this last point, see Kunitzsch (1959, 1966).
4
See Lemay (1962). The doctrine of De magnis coniunctionibus (translated by John of Seville from Kitāb al-qirānāt) which exposes the effects of planetary combinations on the rise and fall of dynasties and earthly kingdoms exerted a persistent influence in the Middle Ages, whose traces can still be found in Rheticus, pp. 47-8, 98-9.
5
The classic study on this subject is in Millás Vallicrosa (1931). See also the work of synthesis entitled ‘Las primeras traducciones científicas de origen oriental hasta mediados del siglo XII’ in Millás Vallicrosa (1960:79-115).
6
See the edition of this treatise by Poulle (1964) (with a list of existing editions of Latin treatises on the astrolabe, pp. 870-2). See also Poulle, ‘Raymond of Marseilles’, in Dictionary of Scientific Biography, XI, 1975, pp. 321-3.
7
There is no modern edition of Plato of Tivoli’s translation, which was published in Nuremberg in 1537 under the title De scientiis astrorum.
8
There is no modern edition of the Toledan tables, but see the detailed analysis by Toomer (1968).
9
An annotated list of the Latin translations attributed to Gerard of Cremona can be found in Lemay, ‘Gerard of Cremona’, Dictionary of Scientific Biography, XV, 1978, pp. 173-92. For the Arabic-Latin tradition of the Almagest, see Kunitzsch (1974).
10
The planetary positions calculated from the Toledan tables do in fact coincide well with the values given by Profatius, as demonstrated by Toomer (1973).
11
The Arabic text of this treatise has not been found. The Latin version by Gerard of Cremona appears in Millás Vallicrosa (1943-50:487-509) (reprinted in Millás Vallicrosa 1960:191-209) and in Carmody (1960). The attribution of this work, which is definitely not by Thābit, is currently disputed: Millás Vallicrosa has rejected the attribution to al-Zarqāllu, supported by Duhem (1913-59:II, 246f); the attribution to Ibrāhīm b. Sinān, the grandson of Thābit b. Qurra, is supported by Ragep (1993:400-08). An annotated translation can be found in Neugebauer (1962b).
12
Most of the values that follow are taken from Hartner, ‘Al-Battānī’, in Dictionary of Scientific Biography, I, 1970, pp. 507-16.
13
The Latin version of this treatise has been edited by Carmody (1960), who attributes it to Gerard of Cremona. This attribution is considered doubtful by Morelon, who also thinks that the original Arabic text came from the circle of the Banū Mūsā and not from Thābit: see Thābit ibn Qurra, pp. XLVI-LII.
14
On this model, and on theories of precession generally in the Middle Ages, see Mercier (1976-7), Goldstein (1964a).
15
Analysis of some texts relating to this tradition can be found, for example, in North (1976), vol. 3, pp. 238-70.

-304-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Encyclopedia of the History of Arabic Science
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 330

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.