Advances in Written Text Analysis

By Malcolm Coulthard | Go to book overview

5

Predictive categories in expository text

Angele Tadros

The approach to text pragmatics presented here is based on research into the discourse structure of expository text. The initial corpus investigated was drawn from A Textbook of Economics (Hanson 1953 [1972]), and a model of discourse analysis was designed (Tadros 1981) using the notion of Prediction. The corpus was later expanded to include other areas such as law, stylistics and linguistics.


THEORETICAL ASSUMPTIONS

The model of discourse analysis presented here is based on two basic assumptions. The first is that written text is interactive since two participants are involved: writer and reader, although, of course, ‘the exigencies of the medium oblige one of the participants to be only represented at the writing stage, thus complicating the process for both parties’ (Sinclair 1980:255). This means that the writer takes on the roles of both addresser and addressee and incorporates the interaction within the encoding process itself (see Widdowson 1978a: 21).

The second assumption is that the writer is in agreement with the propositions expressed in the text unless s/he specifically signals detachment. So, for instance, if the writer says, ‘Every commodity is nothing more than a bundle of services’, s/he will be taken to be in agreement with the proposition, but if s/he says ‘It has been pointed out by some economists that every commodity is nothing more than a bundle of services’, s/he is overtly detaching him/herself from the proposition and attributing it to some other entity. In this latter case, s/he will at a later point be expected to give an evaluation of the proposition expressed.


THE NOTION OF PREDICTION

The term Prediction has previously been used in a generalized sense to refer to the activity of guessing or anticipating what will come in the text, an activity based on the reader’s common-sense knowledge of the world, of content and formal schemata (Carrell 1983; Swales 1986). As used here, however, the term is much more specific: it refers to an interactional

-69-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Advances in Written Text Analysis
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 320

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.