Advances in Written Text Analysis

By Malcolm Coulthard | Go to book overview

APPENDIX II

ZPG testAnalysed by non-rankshifted clauses

Key

BOLD SMALL CAPS

indicate the Theme of the clause

Italics

indicate the N-Rheme of the clause

Underlining

as in the original

Numbering

Capital letters indicate paragraphs.

Arabic numbers indicate punctuated sentences or other segments.

Small letters indicate clauses within a sentence.

B4

AT 7:00 A. M. ON OCTOBER 25, our phones started to ring.

B5

CALLS jammed our switchboard all day.

B6a

STAFFERS stayed late into the night.

B6b

answering questions

B6c

AND talking with reporters from newspapers, radio stations, wire services and TV stations in every part of the country.

C7a

WHEN WE released the results of ZPG’s 1985 Urban Stress Test,

C7b

WE had no idea we’d get such an overwhelming response.

C8

MEDIA AND PUBLIC REACTION has been nothing short of incredible!

D9

AT FIRST, THE DELUGE OF CALLS came mostly from reporters eager to tell the public about Urban Stress Test results and from outraged public officials who were furious that we had ‘blown the whistle’ on conditions in their cities.

E10

Now, WE are hearing from concerned citizens in all parts of the country who want to know what they can do to hold local officials accountable for tackling population-related problems that threaten public health and well-being.

F11a

ZPG’s 1985 URBAN STRESS TEST, «F11b», is the nation’s first survey of how population-linked pressures affect U. S. cities.

F11b

created after months of persistent and exhaustive research,

F12

IT ranks 184 urban areas on 77 different criteria ranging from crowding and birth rates to air quality and toxic wastes.

G13

THE URBAN STRESS TEST translates complex, technical data into an easy-to-use action tool for concerned citizens, elected officials and opinion leaders.

G14a

BUT to use it well,

G14b

WE urgently need your help.

H15a

OUR SMALL STAFF is being swamped with requests for more information

H15b

AND OUR MODEST RESOURCES are being stretched to the limit.

116

YOUR SUPPORT NOW is critical.

117

ZPG’s 1985 URBAN STRESS TEST may be our best opportunity ever to get the population message heard.

-246-

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