Anti-Libertarianism: Markets, Philosophy, and Myth

By Alan Haworth | Go to book overview

Part II

Whenever I thought of you I couldn’t help thinking of a particular incident which seemed to me very important. You and I were walking along the river towards the railway bridge and we had a heated discussion in which you made a remark about ‘national character’ that shocked me by its primitiveness. I then thought: what is the use of studying philosophy if all that it does for you is to enable you to talk with some plausibility about some abstruse questions of logic, etc., and if it does not improve your thinking about the important questions of everyday life, if it does not make you more conscientious than any . . . journalist in the use of the dangerous phrases such people use for their own ends.

Ludwig Wittgenstein, letter to Norman Malcolm (Malcolm 1958: 39)

-65-

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Anti-Libertarianism: Markets, Philosophy, and Myth
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents vii
  • Preface and Acknowledgements ix
  • Part I 1
  • Chapter 1 - Libertarianism - Anti-Libertarianism 3
  • Chapter 2 - Market Romances I 6
  • Chapter 3 - Reducibility, Freedom, the Invisible Hand 12
  • Chapter 4 - Market Romances II 32
  • Chapter 5 - On Freedom 38
  • Chapter 6 - The Legend of the Angels and the Fable of the Bees 58
  • Part II 65
  • Chapter 7 - Moralising the Market 67
  • Chapter 8 - Rights, Wrongs and Rhetoric 72
  • Chapter 9 - Visions of Valhalla 94
  • Part III 105
  • Chapter 10 - The Good Fairy's Wand 107
  • Chapter 11 - Hayek and the Hand of Fate 115
  • Chapter 12 - Conclusions and Postscript 130
  • Notes 134
  • Bibliography 143
  • Index 147
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