Anti-Libertarianism: Markets, Philosophy, and Myth

By Alan Haworth | Go to book overview

Index
Ackroyd, Peter 105, 130, 133
Aids 109, 122
‘all is the one’ 97
analytic philosophy 42ff;
and libertarian theory 94-8;
and political thought 97
anti-consequentialist argument for rights 67ff;
appeals to the moral sense 72;
and arguments from intuition 72-6;
leaves a great deal open 70;
and Locke’s argument for rights 72
anti-libertarianism, a more appropriate name for libertarianism 5
arguments from intuition see intuition/arguments from intuition
Austin, J. L. 46;
contrast with Berlin 43ff;
on ‘our common stock of words’ 43ff;
on freedom 43ff;
a ‘weak’ negativist’ 43
Baker, John 135n
barber(s) friendly neighbourhood 86;
racist 86-7, 88
‘barber’ argument (Nozick on Williams) 81-9;
the ‘barber’ example 82;
Colonel Blimp, Son of Blimp and ‘Stalin’ 84;
context implicitly presupposed by Nozick 86-7;
disagreement presented by Nozick as a clash of intuitions 83;
elements of Nozick’s argument 83;
‘naming of cats’ fallacy 85;
exemplifies Nozick’s rhetorical technique 89-90;
schematic nature of Nozick’s presentation 86-7;
Williams misinterpreted by Nozick 87-9
Becker, Lawrence:
on property rights 80;
see also property rights
bees, contrast with humans 59-60, 126;
cannot envisage other possibilities 60;
are perfectly socialised 59;
lack self-consciousness, etc. 59;
and totalitarianism 59;
see also ‘Fable of the Bees’
Bentham, Jeremy: J. S. Mill on 134n
Berlin, Sir Isaiah:
common sense invocations of 45;
contrast with Austin 43ff;
on freedom, essentially negative character of 19, Chapter 5 passim;
no harmonious realisation of human ends 95;
on Helvetius 136n;
‘jumping ten feet’ example 42, 51-3, 61;
‘liberty is liberty, not equality’ etc. 11;
on J. S. Mill’s definition of ‘freedom’ 44-5;
negative/positive freedom distinction misconstrued by 55;
and the obstacle/incapacity distinction 52;
on ‘political’ freedom 49, 137n;
on ‘positive’ freedom 45, 48;
a strong negativist 44;
on wants 44;
see also blocking model (of freedom);
freedom/liberty (concept/definition of);
negativism;
‘Two Concepts of Liberty’

-147-

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Anti-Libertarianism: Markets, Philosophy, and Myth
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents vii
  • Preface and Acknowledgements ix
  • Part I 1
  • Chapter 1 - Libertarianism - Anti-Libertarianism 3
  • Chapter 2 - Market Romances I 6
  • Chapter 3 - Reducibility, Freedom, the Invisible Hand 12
  • Chapter 4 - Market Romances II 32
  • Chapter 5 - On Freedom 38
  • Chapter 6 - The Legend of the Angels and the Fable of the Bees 58
  • Part II 65
  • Chapter 7 - Moralising the Market 67
  • Chapter 8 - Rights, Wrongs and Rhetoric 72
  • Chapter 9 - Visions of Valhalla 94
  • Part III 105
  • Chapter 10 - The Good Fairy's Wand 107
  • Chapter 11 - Hayek and the Hand of Fate 115
  • Chapter 12 - Conclusions and Postscript 130
  • Notes 134
  • Bibliography 143
  • Index 147
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