The Confederate Republic: A Revolution against Politics

By George C. Rable | Go to book overview

ACKNOWLEDGMENTS

A s this project lengthened in both pages and time, so did the list of the author's obligations to family, friends, and colleagues. The people mentioned below deserve much more than a thank you and (for the unlucky ones) a free copy of this book, but they must also realize that if such debts can be repaid at all, they can only be repaid in kind.

My wife, Kay, has shown amazingly little interest in Confederate political culture. But she cheerfully (more or less) read proofs, offered occasional but valuable suggestions on sticky points of style, and applied her superb skills as a librarian to tracking down some elusive sources. She has also reminded me often and gently that there is much more to life than writing but at the same time tolerates (and even encourages) my often compulsive behavior.

Daughters Anne and Katie have enjoyed bursting into the study for an endless variety of reasons. Their "interruptions" have been welcome most of the time. Games of various types, tennis, catch, bike rides, movies, track meets, swim meets, a few hands of euchre, softball games, basketball games, and conversations have not really delayed the completion of this project and have infinitely enriched my life. Even their disdain for visiting historical sites has a certain exasperating charm.

A National Endowment for the Humanities Summer Stipend provided time for writing the first three chapters. The faculty development committee at Anderson University through its Falls Fund was a steady source of support for travel. At several places, most notably Duke University, the

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