Bourdieu and Education: Acts of Practical Theory

By Michael David James Grenfell | Go to book overview

Chapter 10

Conclusion

We noted in the introduction that this book arose from a conviction that research carried out in terms of Bourdieu’s theory of practice offers insights and understandings which show up elements of pedagogic processes which are not easily visible in other approaches. We also outlined two main aims. The first of these was to present the main components of Bourdieu’s theoretical position in a way which would highlight its implications for education; the second was to offer practical examples of the ideas in use in educational settings. We have sought to meet these aims in an integrated fashion, through a process of assembly and interconnection of a series of chapters with various theoretical, practical and empirical emphases.

As we near the end of the book, it is worth referring to another aspect of it that was signalled at the very beginning, in our choice of ‘Acts of Practical Theory’ as a subtitle. This was a deliberate reference to Bourdieu’s own research journal Actes de la Recherche en Sciences Sociales. ‘Actes’ in French can, of course, simply refer to research papers or proceedings, yet there are many other connotations, as there are with the English ‘acts’. They include enactment, performance, an Act in a play, an Act of Parliament, even a ‘deed’ (interestingly, a commercial or legal document which gives a symbolic permanence to sets of actions). It is thus a word which calls attention to both dynamic and contextual matters. We felt that this sense best summed up the spirit of the book. We see the pieces of research reported here as individual ‘acts’ to understand various educational phenomena in terms of the dynamic processes and surroundings, both material and ideational, which give rise to them and are in turn re-constituted by them. At the same time, we have highlighted the individual contributors’ awareness of the conditions of these acts themselves by calling on a level of reflexivity which renders visible important elements of their production and construction. By acting as a researcher, any individual is already taking up a position with respect to the object of study that is distinct from a’common sense’ relation. Moreover, the researcher is connecting with an academic, scientific field with its own structures, values and expectations.

At different points in this book we have acknowledged that the kind of investigation and analysis Bourdieu’s work promotes can be uncomfortable to carry out. His own position is opposed to—yet also a synthesis of—a number of orthodoxies in the social sciences, and this makes him a target of attack. It can also feel like a risky endeavour to advocate the extension of a theory of practice outside of its sociological base, but we have done so in various ways to a greater or lesser extent. We do not wish to attempt any totalizing justification for these extensions,

-179-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Bourdieu and Education: Acts of Practical Theory
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 202

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.