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Bourdieu and Education: Acts of Practical Theory

By Michael David James Grenfell | Go to book overview

Notes on Contributors

Michael Grenfell presently works in the Centre for Language in Education at the University of Southampton. He was associate researcher at the Centre de Sociologie Européenne in Paris and has collaborated with Bourdieu in projects on language and scholastic exclusion. He is the co-founder of an international network of scholars working with Bourdieu’s ideas and organizer of a major international conference on Bourdieu: Language, Culture, and Education. He is also joint convenor of symposia on Bourdieu at the conferences of the British and European educational research associations. His research interests include the sociology of language, teacher education and philosophical issues in educational research.

Phil Hodkinson is professor of post-compulsory education and training in the Manchester Metropolitan University. He worked as a teacher for twenty years before entering Higher Education. He has a long-standing interest in the transition from school to work, and in the lives and experiences of young people. His recent research interests include career decision making and the role of careers guidance. He is exploring the value of hermeneutics in understanding the nature of qualitative research.

David James began his teaching career in Further Education. He now works in the Faculty of Education at the University of the West of England, Bristol, where he is Director of the Research Degrees Programme and editor of The Redland Papers. He has jointly organized symposia and presented a number of papers at national and international conferences on the significance of Bourdieu’s ideas for understanding educational processes. His interests include the study of teaching, learning and assessment across a range of settings in post-compulsory education.

Diane Reay is research fellow working at King’s College, London. Prior to moving into Higher Education she worked as a primary school teacher in inner London for twenty years. She researched and published in the areas of children’s peer group cultures, parental choice, staff relations in secondary schools, ability groupings, feminist theory and methodology, social mobility and young people’s choice of Higher Education. She is currently researching into children as consumers of popular culture and urban space.

Derek Robbins read English at Cambridge and did his doctorate under Raymond Williams. He has taught at what is now the University of East London since 1970.

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