George Orwell: The Critical Heritage

By Jeffrey Meyers | Go to book overview

This is a human book: it shows us the heart of innocence that lies in revolution; also the miasma of lying that, far more than the cruelty takes the heart out of it.


39.

A. W. J., Manchester Guardian

14 June 1938, p. 8

Mr Orwell fought in the P. O. U. M. militia; he considers Fascism the greatest danger of to-day and sees in the Catholic Church of Spain the working man’s enemy. The merit of his book is that he takes this stand without being blind to the faults of those who share his beliefs and writes without rant and ideological malice. His story of the fighting in the Aragon hills, in which he took part, reads excellently well, perhaps because he describes things more often than feelings (thus avoiding the main fault of the novelists of war). There is a fine air of classical detachment about his description of war’s horrors: ‘If there is one thing I hate more than another it is a rat running over me in the darkness. There are no false heroics and no needless trafficking in sordidness.

The part about the politics of loyal Spain makes confusion clear and the defence of the Trotskyist P. O. U. M. is convincing. The division in Spanish politics lay between those who felt that before the war could be won a social revolution must take place and those, led by the now highly respectable Communists, who held that the winning of the war was more important than radical social change. The revolutionary workers have been defeated, the Communist view has prevailed, and the Spanish Government has become extremely ‘Liberal’; but Mr Orwell makes the case for the factiousness of his own comrades very plain. It is characteristic of the Spanish people that even the advance of the foreign enemy could not bring them to settle their political differences without bloodshed.

-130-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
George Orwell: The Critical Heritage
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 392

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.