George Orwell: The Critical Heritage

By Jeffrey Meyers | Go to book overview

85.

I. Anisimov, Pravda

12 May 1950

In Current Digest of the Soviet Press, 1 July 1950, pp. 14-15.

In recent times there has been wide dissemination of fantastic novels and stories which contain the most gruesome predictions of what mankind may expect in the near future. The authors of such prognostications confidently anticipate third and even fourth world wars and relish the horror of mass extermination of people with atomic and bacteriological bombs. With evil joy they predict that an end will necessarily be put to culture, art and mankind as a whole.

In inventing their squalid fantasies, these writers, if we may be pardoned for calling them that, describe the monsters which will inhabit the earth after mankind has eliminated itself from its face. These will be monkeys or bats who, it is said, will ‘attain a higher spiritual level than human beings. ’ What misanthropy!

The works of misanthropic fantasy very closely resembleone another. Especially monstrous are two books which are fervently advertised and published every place corrupted by the activity of American imperialism. These books, written by Anglo-American cosmopolitans A. Huxley and G. Orwell, are entitled respectively ‘Ape and Essence’ and ‘1984’ ….

Mr Orwell is in every way similar to Mr Huxley, especially in his contempt for people, in his aim of slandering man. And while the one cries out, ‘The voice of the proletariat is the voice of the devil, ’ the other, slobbering with poisonous spittle, does not lag far behind him. For in describing a most monstrous future in store for man, he imputes every evil to the people. He is obliged to admit that in 1984, when the events in the novel take place, capitalism will cease to exist, but only for opening the way to endless wars and the degradation of mankind, which will be brought down to the level of robots called ‘proles. ’

It is clear that Orwell’s filthy book is in the spirit of such a vital organ of American propaganda as the Reader’s Digest which published this work, and Life which presented it with many illustrations.

-282-

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