Arthur Hugh Clough: The Critical Heritage

By Michael Thorpe | Go to book overview

POEMS BY ARTHUR HUGH CLOUGH (1862)

(including Amours de Voyage, first published, Atlantic Monthly, 1858)

24.

Francis Turner Palgrave’s ‘Memoir’ to The Poems by Arthur Hugh Clough

(1862; 1863)

Palgrave (1824-97) was a poet and critic, a close friend of Tennyson and editor of the Golden Treasury; he was Professor of Poetry at Oxford, 1885-95. The ‘Memoir’ is the final revised version of an article printed in Fraser’s Magazine, LXV, April 1862, 527-36.

Arthur Hugh Clough, born at Liverpool, 1st January 1819, was educated at Rugby. His career there has been sketched by a distinguished schoolfellow, from whose interesting notice the following lines are extracted. Arthur Stanley thus writes:

Of all the scholars at Rugby School, in the time when Arnold’s influence was at its height, there was none who so completely represented the place in all its phases as Clough. He had come there as a very young boy, and gradually worked his way from form to form till he reached the top of the school. He did not, like some of the more distinguished of his contemporaries, hold aloof from the common world of schoolboy life, but mingled freely in the games and sports of his schoolfellows. He received also into an unusually susceptible and eager mind the whole force of that electric shock which Arnold communicated to all his better pupils. Over the career of none of his pupils did Arnold watch with a livelier interest or a more sanguine hope. By none, during those last years of school life, or first years of college life, was that interest more actively reciprocated in the tribute of enthusiastic affection than by Clough.

He came up to Oxford, and carried away the Balliol scholarship with a

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