Arthur Hugh Clough: The Critical Heritage

By Michael Thorpe | Go to book overview

50.

Coventry Patmore, ‘Arthur Hugh Clough’, a review in St. James’s Gazette

10 August 1888, 7

This review was reprinted in Principle of Art (London, 1889), 106-12.

Patmore (1823-96) was a poet influenced by the Pre-Raphaelites; his The Angel in the House, a long sentimental poem celebrating wedded love was issued in parts during the 1850s and became one of the most popular poems in Victorian England. He entered the Roman Catholic Church in 1862.

This is a review of two volumes published in 1888, Poems of Arthur Hugh Clough, New & Revised Edition (London: Macmillan) and Prose Remains of Arthur Hugh Clough, with a Selection from his Letters and a Memoir edited by his wife (London: Macmillan). The contents of these volumes were virtually identical with those of the similar publications of 1869, with these exceptions: the Rugby Magazine poem ‘Thoughts of Home’ (‘I watched them from the window’) has been dropped from the Poems and there is no memoir; the ‘Review of Mr. Newman’s The Soul’ has been left out of the Prose. This new version of the Poems was printed seven times, the last occasion being in 1909. After this date, there was no more comprehensive edition of the poems attempted until 1951.

Arthur Hugh Clough, though he cannot take rank high among artists, whether in prose or verse, who have acquired a classic position by the production of works which are the flowering in beauty and repose of a unique individuality, is not for a moment to be confused with the great crowd of writers who, however excellent they may have been in their lines, have never obtained a hearing through the noble and preponderating interest of personal character. Clough worshipped Truth with more than the passion of a lover, and his writings are, M

-335-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Arthur Hugh Clough: The Critical Heritage
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 414

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.