The Image of the Indian: The Canadian Indian as a Subject and a Concept in a Sampling of the Popular National Magazines Read in Canada, 1900-1970

By Ronald Graham Haycock | Go to book overview

PREFACE

The intention in writing this paper is to take a look at a representation of what Canadians were reading about their Indians over seventy years of this century. The purpose is to determine what view of the Canadian Indian writers were extending in the popular national magazines, and to suggest attitudes and changes in attitudes during these seven decades.

The thesis involves a need for some definition of what is considered to be the English language national, popular magazine press. Because of the problems involved in research of this type, especially in a country where no clearly defined popular national magazine press has evolved, an explanation of the methodology is needed. Review of Reviews, in a 1906 survey of what Canadians read, concluded that in the popular magazine field, which was very small, Canadian Magazine was the only one that even approached a national level.1 The natural void in the field was filled by the common American and British publications. Indeed, the Canada Year Book, 1959, described the Canadian magazine press as a mere journalistic transplant that finally spread throughout Canada.2 Klinck supports this contention that the standard British and American publications were read widely by Canadians on a national level.3 There was much concern over the difficulty of establishing a native popular magazine press over the years, serious enough, indeed, to see government royal commissions appointed to investigate the problem. The Massey Commission in 1951 concluded the above-mentioned facts.4 The O'Leary Commission of 1961 also investigated similar problems. It was primarily concerned with combatting the influx of foreign magazines which was seen as a threat to a distinctive culture for Canada but it clearly made the point that the indigenous magazine press was small and, indeed, succumbing to the American press.5

These sources indicate that very few magazines which could be termed "national" and "popular" in the sense of not regional and for the "provision of entertainment and general information"6 of the average Canadian, were native to Canada. This is not to say that other Canadian periodicals did not exist--they certainly did. In the early years of the century Canadian Magazine was the only one considered to qualify. There were others but they were regional, not national, small and often short-lived.7

Magazines such as MacLean's and Saturday Night are the obvious choices in the later years but not in the first decades because there was no clear definition yet, because the field of native periodicals was still small, and because the nation itself was regional until well after the Second Great War. As a result the author

____________________
1
P. T. McGrath, "What the People Read in Canada" in Review of Reviews, XXXIII ( June, 1906), pp. 720-722.
2
Canada, Bureau of Statistics, Canada Year Book, 1959 ( Ottawa: Queen's Printer, 1959), p. 883. This volume and the one previous contain a history of Canadian journalism.
3
Carl F. Klinck (ed.), Literary History of Canada ( Toronto: University of Toronto Press, 1966), pp. 174-207.
4
Canada, Royal Commission on National Development in the Arts, Letters and Sciences, Report. Vincent Masseyet al. ( Ottawa: King's Printer, 1951), pp. 60-64.
5
Canada, Royal Commission on Publications, Report. M. G. O'Learyet al. ( Ottawa: Queen's Printer, 1961).
6
Ibid., p. 12.
7
H. J. Morgan and L. J. Burpee, Canadian Life in Town and Country ( London: George Newnes, Ltd., 1905), pp. 170-191. Also see W. S. Wallace (ed.), The Encyclopedia of Canada ( Toronto: University Associates of Canada, Ltd., 1948), Vol. III, pp. 310-315.

-v-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
The Image of the Indian: The Canadian Indian as a Subject and a Concept in a Sampling of the Popular National Magazines Read in Canada, 1900-1970
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 98

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.