Andrew Marvell, the Critical Heritage

By Elizabeth Story Donno | Go to book overview

4.

[? Joseph Glanvill] on the Rehearsal Transpros’d

1674

Publication of RT II in 1673 and again in 1674 elicited an anonymous twelve-page letter entitled An Apology and Advice For some of the Clergy…. Written on the Occasion of the Second Part Of the Rehearsal Transpros’d. Having conceded that Marvell has had the better of the argument, the author offers a defense of Parker and advice as to his future conduct.

Jackson I. Cope (Joseph Glanvill: Anglican Apologist, St Louis, 1956) believes that it is the work of Glanvill, a friend of Parker’s, and that it echoes his later publications. Some supporting evidence is afforded by the listing of this title among the books advertised by Glanvill in his Essays, 1676. Cope would also attribute to Glanvill the threat to cut the author’s throat which was signed ‘J. G. and which Marvell reprinted on the title page to Part II.

Extracts from pp. 1-2, 4-5, 8-9.

SIR,

I have now read the second part of the Rehearsal Transprosed, which you so earnestly recommend to me in your last: And am very sorry to see that the difference between those ingenious men is inflamed to this height; and that the Controversie should be so far run out into matters of personal abuse. I shall not tell you at this time who I think hath the better in the argument; This is obvious, that M[aster] M[arvell] hath much the advantage in the Reproaching part. For though I confidently believe that his Adversary is clear, as to the foul things laid to his charge by this Author; Yet He is a Clergy man, and it is not enough for them to be innocent, while there are any who have the ill-will to accuse them; and such there will be, while there are Sects, and Jovial Atheists in

-42-

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