Andrew Marvell, the Critical Heritage

By Elizabeth Story Donno | Go to book overview

in grammar learning was sent to Cambridge, particularly, as I conceive, to Trin. coll. where obtaining the mastership of the Latin tongue became assistant to Joh. Milton when he was Latin secretary to Oliver, and very intimate and conversant with that person. A little before his majesty’s restoration the burghers of his native place of Kingston before mention’d did choose him their representative to sit in that parliament that began at Westminster the 25th of April 1660, and again after his majesty’s restoration for that which began at the same place, 8 May 1661, and they loved him so well that they gave him an honourable pension to maintain him. From which time to his death, he was esteemed (tho’ in his conversation very modest and of few words) a very celebrated wit among the fanatics, and the only one truly so, for many years after…. This Andrew Marvell, who is supposed to have written other things, as I have told you in Joh. Denham, vol. iii, col. 827. died on the 18th of August 1678, and was buried under the pews in the south side of the church of S. Giles in the Fields, near London. Afterwards his widow published of his composition Miscellaneous Poems. Lond. 1681. fol. which were then taken into the hands of many persons of his persuasion, and by them cried up as excellent.


11.

Dean Swift’s allusion to the controversy

1710

Swift’s A Tale of a Tub appeared in 1704, and in 1710 he added ‘An Apology’ to the fifth edition of the work which includes the often cited reference to Marvell.

Extract from ‘An Apology, ’ A6v-7.

-54-

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