Andrew Marvell, the Critical Heritage

By Elizabeth Story Donno | Go to book overview
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These Moralists could act and comprehend:
They knew how genuine glory was put on;
Taught us how rightfully a nation shone
In splendour: what strength was, that would not bend
But in magnanimous meekness. France, ’tis strange,
Hath brought forth no such souls as we had then.
Perpetual emptiness! unceasing change!
No single Volume paramount, no code,
No master spirit, no determined road;
But equally a want of Books and Men!


41.

Three political comparisons

1735-1845

In December 1726, Caleb D’Anvers (Nicholas Amhurst) started the Craftsman, a periodical designed to oppose Sir Robert Walpole as a ‘man of craft. Bolingbroke was its most distinguished contributor. The article ‘Mr. Bayes modernized’ first appeared in the Craftsman, 8 February 1735, signed ‘D, with citations from RT I in order to point up the political analogies. It was almost immediately reprinted, with minor variants, in the Gentleman’s Magazine.

In the summer of 1794, Henry Wansey (1751-1827), a nonconformist entrepreneur, made an excursion to the United States and recorded his experiences in a journal which was to be published two years later. A second edition appeared in 1796 and an edition by D. J. Jeremy (Philadelphia: American Philosophical Society), 1970.

In a letter written in 1845, the American writer and statesman James Russell Lowell comments on Marvell, including a reference to the hoary legend that he was the last to receive

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