Ventriloquized Voices: Feminist Theory and English Renaissance Texts

By Elizabeth D. Harvey | Go to book overview

ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS

At many moments during the writing of this book I was aware of the numerous voices who served as inspiration, who offered correctives, skeptical questions, and encouragement. They have sometimes become so internalized as to be indistinguishable from my own, but I can enumerate many of my teachers, colleagues, and friends who contributed: Sharon Cameron, Jonathan Crewe, Jonathan Goldberg, Stanley Fish, Timothy Hampton, Linda Hutcheon, Katharine Maus, Janel Mueller, William Oram, Patricia Parker, Balachandra Rajan, Nancy Vickers, and the late Richard B. Young. I need to record a special debt of gratitude to Lee Patterson and Stephen Orgel, under whose expert direction I wrote an early version of the Sappho chapter. It was Lee Patterson who first urged me to think about the question of ventriloquism, and Stephen Orgel then and since has provided a continually challenging model for reading Renaissance texts. Kristin Brady’s friendship, wise counsel, and vital support, especially at a number of critical junctures, have been invaluable. Carole Farber was a source of bibliographical lore and supplied an important cross-disciplinary perspective. Margaret Ferguson, Mary Nyquist, Richard Regosin, and Miglena Nikolchina all read the manuscript, and their generous and perceptive comments, as well as those from anonymous readers for Routledge, sent me back to rethink both specific details and the larger premises of my argument. My students at the University of Western Ontario (in the English Department, the Center for Women’s Studies and Feminist Research, and in the Center for the Study of Theory and Criticism) have left a permanent imprint on the book through their engagement with its arguments. Two research assistants, Elizabeth Sauer and David Kinahan, were extraordinarily diligent, precise, and creative in their work on the book. The audiences to whom I delivered oral versions

-ix-

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Ventriloquized Voices: Feminist Theory and English Renaissance Texts
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents vii
  • Acknowledgements ix
  • Introduction 1
  • 1 - Travesties of Voice 15
  • 2 - Folly and Hysteria 54
  • 3 - Matrix as Metaphor 76
  • 4 - Ventriloquizing Sappho, or the Lesbian Muse 116
  • Coda 140
  • Notes 143
  • References 158
  • Index 169
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