Group Interactive Art Therapy: Its Use in Training and Treatment

By Diane Waller | Go to book overview

Chapter 7

Short-term interactive art therapy groups

Art therapists have traditionally been employed in large psychiatric hospitals where they have often worked with groups of in-patients on acute admissions as well as long-stay wards. They have tended to run so-called ‘open groups’, which consist of a studio-type room into which patients may wander at various times of day, sometimes painting, sometimes not. Alternatively, ‘projective art groups’ may be held, where one-off themes are set by whoever happens to be running the group. Often this is not a qualified art or group therapist. In either case, little attention is paid to the dynamics of the group.

Conducting groups in acute admissions wards has been seen by most workers as difficult, given that the patient population changes frequently and patients are very disturbed and often heavily medicated. Yalom, in Inpatient Group Psychotherapy (1983) points out that workers are generally only familiar with the long-term model of groups (based on groups in private practice or out-patient groups consisting of well-functioning individuals). Currently, there is no coherent, commonly accepted method for running in-patient groups so there is often confusion and ineffective conducting, whereas it would be possible, by adapting the model, to run short-term interactive groups.

Such groups as there are in acute wards are often run by non-trained personnel. There is competition for time and the groups are not taken very seriously. Sometimes they are set up without full knowledge and permission from the ward administration and this can lead to tension and even sabotage. In my experience, art therapy groups are no exception and art therapists have reported being frustrated by the ever-changing population in the ‘open’ groups which they have felt obliged to run.

Yalom’s research on the effects of groups run on three different wards in different institutions revealed, not surprisingly, that the more highly the group is valued by all the staff, the more effective it is for the patients. If a group is run by non-trained staff and seen to be less important than other activities on the ward, patients will feel it is not worth making a commitment. What usually happens in such groups is that they are held irregularly,

-73-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Group Interactive Art Therapy: Its Use in Training and Treatment
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 168

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.