Group Interactive Art Therapy: Its Use in Training and Treatment

By Diane Waller | Go to book overview

Case example 1

Rooms and materials

ROOM AND MATERIALS: I

I was asked by the director of a therapeutic community treating drug and alcohol abuse to run an introductory art therapy course for his staff, which included many people from other countries training in methods of treating substance abuse. I gave an outline for a week-long programme which included several experiential (practical) workshops. I described the method I would use and the materials needed; the maximum number of participants to be twelve.

I met the director. He explained it was the first time that art therapy would be introduced and everyone was excited. He asked me to take thirty trainees, as had been the case with previous courses (e.g. psychodrama). I explained that my approach, which was experiential and required working with art materials (something the participants had never done), was not suitable for such a large group. I could present a seminar or lecture to a larger group but the course participants would be limited to twelve. We compromised on fourteen.

I said we should need a large room as people would move about. Also that it should not be carpeted as it could get messy. Water should be easily available. I gave a list of materials required for the practical workshops.

On arrival at the centre two days before the course, I found I had been allocated sixteen participants and an interpreter. The room was the main seminar room for the centre, complete with carpet, chairs with folding writing block and one or two small tables. The nearest water was in the kitchen, a few minutes walk away. It was exactly the kind of room which should be kept clean and tidy and which was totally inhibiting for our purpose!

I checked with the staff at the centre how far I could go in reorganising the room, beginning with removing the carpet. That was agreed. I asked for several old tables, newspapers and plastic sheeting for the floor, plastic buckets, a mop and a large amount of rag. There was very little wall space uncluttered but I checked the possibility of blue-tacking and pinning

-95-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Group Interactive Art Therapy: Its Use in Training and Treatment
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 168

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.