Group Interactive Art Therapy: Its Use in Training and Treatment

By Diane Waller | Go to book overview

Case example 11

Boundary violation and scapegoating in a training group

This was a group of nine in an introductory art therapy programme lasting one week. It consisted of daily art therapy workshops run on an interactive model but with some initial setting of open-ended themes by myself. Some theoretical and practical media sessions were also included.

Many of the trainees had an art or art teaching background and were clear that the course was an introduction after which they might be able to consider taking further training in an Art Therapy programme. There were seven women and two men.

It is usual in this centre for the trainees and the conductors to have meals together and on the Sunday evening I encountered some of the participants in the dining room. I am usually friendly and willing to talk about art therapy in general but careful not to get involved in any more ‘personal’ discussion as it makes holding the boundaries of the course somewhat complicated. The participants sense this, as a rule, and normally we manage well over the week.

However, one participant wanted to engage me in intensive discussion. She did not speak English, however, and my understanding was fair but not good, so she asked another participant who spoke French to translate. She asked me for a critique of her artwork from the point of view of an art therapist. She had brought her work to the course for this purpose. I gently said that it was not part of my role to do this, and added that were I to see her artwork, my response would merely be a personal impression of the work, from one artist to another, so to speak. She was not happy with this and urged me to find time to see the work and offer her an ‘analysis’ of it. I repeated my previous comment and excused myself from the table. She was clearly put out by this and for a moment I wondered if I should have a look at the paintings but quickly concluded that I felt uncomfortable at the request because it implied she had not understood the purpose of the course (clearly advertised as an introductory course in art therapy with emphasis on group work) and wanted her own personal therapy. I made a mental note to stress in my introduction that the course was not therapy but that some personal learning may take place; that I should not be conducting the group

-136-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Group Interactive Art Therapy: Its Use in Training and Treatment
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 168

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.