Child Sexual Abuse: The Search for Healing

By Christopher Bagley; Kathleen King | Go to book overview

Chapter Two

HISTORICAL PERSPECTIVES

CHILD ABUSE AND SOCIAL CHANGE

The French social historian Jean-Claud Chesnais (1981) has charted the important changes in attitudes to children in western societies in the last hundred years, using demographic statistics, public health data, and crime reports. He shows that in a number of countries (particularly Southern Germany and France) high fertility combined with chronic poverty—the lot of many families—led to neglect, abandonment, and deliberate murder (infanticide) of large numbers of children. Those neglected frequently died.

Fathers had virtually absolute power in these poor families, and were the chief purveyors of abuse. In addition to physical abuse, fathers exercised sexual powers over all females in the family, including their own children. In such circumstances sexual abuse of children was so frequent as to be normative in some sectors of the population. As techniques of fertility control increased and poverty declined, the widespread physical abuse, neglect, and murder of children also declined. But the residual power of fathers remained and, Chesnais argues, so did the sexual power and control of these fathers. Sons (who eventually became fathers) were socialized in these norms of absolute power.

Social change in this area has been slow in coming. In Catholic cultures such as France and Southern Germany, sexual abuse of children is still not recognized as a problem. Only certain Protestant or secularized cultures (e.g., United States, England, Canada, Sweden, Norway, Netherlands, Northern Germany). have recently begun to recognize child sexual abuse as a moral, legal, and social problem. According to Chesnais’s data, the sexual abuse of children only entered the child abuse and criminal statistics of these countries in the 1970s. In some

-25-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Child Sexual Abuse: The Search for Healing
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents v
  • Tables vii
  • About the Authors ix
  • Chapter One - The Meaning of Sexual Abuse in Childhood 1
  • Chapter Two - Historical Perspectives 25
  • Chapter Three - Definitions and Ethics 38
  • Chapter Four - Statistical Dimensions 56
  • Chapter Five - A Community Model 78
  • Chapter Six - Trauma to the Child Victim 105
  • Chapter Seven - Healing of the Child Survivor 133
  • Chapter Eight - Healing the Family 157
  • Chapter Nine - Healing of Offenders 182
  • Chapter Ten - Healing of Society 203
  • Chapter Eleven - Implications for Practice and Research 230
  • Bibliography 241
  • Name Index 264
  • Subject Index 269
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 278

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.