The Salmon P. Chase Papers - Vol. 3

By John Niven; James P. McClure et al. | Go to book overview
13. Physician Charles Henry Ray, part owner of the Chicago Tribune.
14. Medill had apparently sent a copy of his editorial, "The Contest of 1860--The Principles and the Men," published in the Chicago Tribune on April 22. "We do not claim the right to speak authoritatively for the Republican party with reference to the policy to be pursued by it in the Presidential contest of 1860," the piece began; "nevertheless, we believe we understand its composition well enough to give assurance in its behalf, that its standard will not be lowered 'one jot or tittle.'"
15. Chase had recently received an invitation from Boston to participate in celebrations of Thomas Jefferson's birthday on April 9. In his response, written on March 29, Chase declined and expounded at length on Jefferson's personal opposition to slavery. Chase to F. W. Bird et al., Mar. 29, 1859 ( Chase Papers, Hist. Soc. of Pa.); Chase to Edward L. Pierce, Mar. 29, 1859 ( Houghton Lib., Harvard Univ.).

FROM JOSEPH MEDILL

Autograph letter on letterhead stationery. Chase Papers, Historical Society of Pennsylvania (micro 19:0909).

Office Chicago Press & Tribune, 51 CLARK STREET, Chicago, June 8 1859

Private

Gov Chase

Dr Sir

I have examined the article in the ColumbusGazette and think, if it was pretty generally circulated, it would accomplish much good. The argument for a Western candidate, is put very pointedly and strongly 1 I hope there was a large extra edition struck off. I want too copies which I can use to capital advantage. Have your private secretary send me that many under one envelope directed to this office. I shall send them to the right hands in the North West. I would ask for a much larger number but presume you have not got them. Before long I propose to write one or more leading articles in favor of nominating a Western candidate, without espousing the claims of any man or of attacking Seward. We do not think it policy thus early to commit our paper publicly to any candidate, but to work underground for you and openly for a Western man. The moment we take sides in our columns for you it will be a Signal for the Seward organs to make fight against you. We must not fire the mine until the powder is properly laid, else there may be a premature explosion that will do more harm than good. I hope you will concur in these prudential views.

Our Mr Scripps started for Minnesota this Morning on a fortnight's tour. He will "put in some licks" for you while up there, and feel the public pulse carefully.2

I observe that the "Americans" in Cincinnati: have revolted and fly the track on the ticket and platform. Will that not lose the legislature to the Republicans? The loss of Hamilton, I presume, will give the Democrats control of the legislature next winter, and reelect Pugh.

-13-

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