The Salmon P. Chase Papers - Vol. 3

By John Niven; James P. McClure et al. | Go to book overview

Convention--perhaps not till the Monday after I shall go to Ohio-- probably to Cincinnati first--& then to Columbus.

Yours truly

ED. L PIERCE

Chase assessed popular support for presidential front runners William H. Seward and Stephen A. Douglas and discussed party politics on the eve of the Republican national convention, scheduled to start in Chicago on May 16. Chase to Pierce, May 10, 1860 ( Houghton Lib., Harvard Univ.); Chicago Tribune, May 17, 1860.
Andrew Gregg Curtin of Pennsylvania.
Maine Republican William Pitt Fessenden had served in the U.S. Senate since 1854. DAB, 6:348.

TO ABRAHAM LINCOLN

Autograph letter. Abraham Lincoln Papers, Library of Congress (micro 13:0796).

Columbus, May 17, 1860.1

My dear Sir,

I congratulate you most heartily on your nomination, & shall support you, in 1860, as cordially and earnestly as I did in 1858.

The excellent platform adopted and the selection, as your associate on the ticket, of that true & able man, Hannibal Hamlin, completes my satisfaction with the results of the Convention.2 They will prove I am confident, as auspicious to the country as they are honorable to the nominees.

Mr. Seward has much reason to be gratified by the large and cordial support which he received, and especially by the generous, unanimous & constant adhesion, without regard to personal preferences, of the entire delegation from his own great state. Doubtless the similar adhesion of the Illinois delegation affords a higher gratification to you than even the nomination itself. The only regret I feel connected with the Convention is excited by the failure of the delegation from Ohio to evince the same generous spirit. In this regret I am quite sure you must participate; for I err greatly in my estimate of your magnamity, if you do not condemn as I do the conduct of delegates, from whatever state, who disregard, while acting as such, the clearly expressed preference of their own State Convention.

Yours cordially

S: P: CHASE

Hon. Abraham Lincoln.

As Lincoln indicated in a brief reply, Chase misdated this letter, which was postmarked on May 19. Chase could not have written it before the eighteenth, when Republicans selected Lincoln as their presidential candidate. Basler, Collected Works, 4:53; Chicago Tribune, May 19, 1860.

-28-

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