The Salmon P. Chase Papers - Vol. 3

By John Niven; James P. McClure et al. | Go to book overview
Unlike that of 1856, the Republican platform of 1860 placed less emphasis on the party's antislavery stance and, among other provisions, endorsed a protective tariff, a homestead act, and construction of the transcontinental railroad. Chicago Tribune, May 18, 1860; Potter, Impending Crisis, 423.

FROM EDWARD I. CHASE

Autograph letter. Chase Papers, Library of Congress (micro 13:0813).

Lockport May 21st 1860

Dear Brother

You have of course heard that I attended the Chicago convention / I did so in pursuance of a note from Hiram Barney--

Messrs Barney Opdike Field1 and some others were there determined if possible to prevent the nomination of Mr Seward and desireous very desireous of your nomination

The Ohio delegation was distracted. They shut them selves up discussing what it was impossible to determine before hand how long they should vote for you as a unite and what other Ohio man then they should vote for as a unite-- This continued Monday Tuesday Wednesday & part of thursday-- Then when they determined to vote their preferences they worked some / But in the mean time those bent on defeating Seward had combined to a great extent on Lincon drawing off many in other states who would have been for you & preventing any break in the Seward Ranks in your favor & they were not likely to break in favor of any one else

Thursday night & Friday morning your real friends from Ohio worked and induced some out of the state to come back & could they have all stood during one session & prevented a nomination there might have been some chance at the next session-- But it was not to be and Mr Lincon was nominated

Mr Opdike wished me to say to you that he much desired your nomination worked for it as long as he could see any chance / But at last felt himself under necessity to effect combinations on Lincon to defeat Seward-- The same in substance D D Field wished me to say-- The desire of our New Yorkers to break the thraldom of the Weed and Seward rule in this State makes them rejoice at almost any thing other than Seward-- Mr D. D. Field also wished me to say to you that you would be the head of the administration if we succeed-- I say this be cause he asked me to do so whether he has any knowledge on the Subject to enable him to speak, with certainty I can not say or whether you would esteem any thing of the kind desireable-- I had rather supposed not

I am in negotiation to sell my house2 -- It is very mortifying to me-- I have some prospect of effecting a loan in which case I shall hang on a

-29-

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