The Salmon P. Chase Papers - Vol. 3

By John Niven; James P. McClure et al. | Go to book overview

TO CHARLES A. DANA

Autograph letter. Charles A. Dana Papers, Library of Congress ( micro 14:0058).

Private Columbus, Nov. 10, 1860.My dear Sir,1I do not know what to say in reply to your wish that I may go into Mr. Lincoln's cabinet,2 except to thank you for the implied appreciation, by which I am ashamed to confess myself not the less gratified because conscious that it goes beyond my deserts.Certainly I do not seek any such place. I greatly prefer my position as Senator and would indeed prefer to that a private Station could I now honorably retire.For, of the great objects which first constrained me into political life, one, the overthrow of the Slave Power, is now happily accomplished, and the other, the denationalization of slavery and the consequent inauguration of an era of constitutional enfranchisement, seems sure to follow;--so that I do not feel any longer that I have "a mission," and therefore allow myself to grow somewhat weary of the harness. But for the present I cannot get unyoked: and must work on awhile longer.And I greatly prefer to work in a legislative than in an administrative position. It is more pleasant on many accounts. Still I do not say that I would refuse the post you refer to. Indeed it would be rather superfluous to decline what has not been offered. Neither do I say I would accept it:--but only this;--that if the offer were made, without any urgency on the part of my friends & under circumstances otherwise agreeable to me I should feel bound to consider it honestly & carefully, with the help of the best advisers I could consult, & should be governed in my decision not so much by my personal inclinations as by my obligations to the cause & its true & faithful friends.I thank you for giving my Covington Speech a place in the Tribune. It has attracted a good deal of attention & will, I hope do some good.3Please give my best regards to Mr. Greeley,--who will, I trust, now find appreciation in some measure proportioned to his great services--and to your other colaborers. How your work shames ours!Sincerely your friend, S: P: CHASE Chas. A. Dana, Esq
At this time, Dana helped edit Horace Greeley New York Tribune. DAB, 5:50.
Dana had suggested the position of Treasury secretory. "Without you, I do not see how we can hope to resist the vast power and unknown genius of the thieves," he wrote. Dana to Chase, Nov. 7, 1860 ( Chase Papers, Hist. Soc. of Pa.).

-32-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
The Salmon P. Chase Papers - Vol. 3
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 452

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.