The Salmon P. Chase Papers - Vol. 3

By John Niven; James P. McClure et al. | Go to book overview
I have written in much haste, but I think you will understand me. What I have written is too crudely expressed for any but friendly eyes; and I hope that you will let nobody see this letter, except if you think fit, our friend Sparhawk and your sister.3Affectionately and faithfully yours, S. P. CHASE. JOHN G. WHITTIER
Chase had visited his former Dartmouth College classmate Thomas Sparhawk, a physician who apparently resided in Massachusetts, during his campaign trip to the Northeast in October. Charles Franklin Emerson, ed., General Catalogue of Dartmouth College . . . ( Hanover, N.H., 1910-11), 242; John Greenleaf Whittier to Chase, Nov. 9, 1860 ( Chase Papers, L.C.).
According to Robert Barnwell Rhett, Congress lacked authority to enact the Fugitive Slave Law. Rhett made his comments in the U.S. Senate on Feb. 24, 1851, two months after he assumed the seat vacated by the death of John C. Calhoun. Bio. Dir. U.S. Cong., 729, 1709; Congressional Globe, 31st Cong., 2d sess., 1851, appen., 318.
Whittier had two sisters: Elizabeth Hussey Whittier ( 1815-64), the closest of three siblings, and Mary Whittier Caldwell ( 1806-61). John B. Pickard, ed., The Letters of John Greenleaf Whittier ( Cambridge, Mass., 1975), 1:11.

TO RUHAMAH LUDLOW HUNT

Autograph copy. Chase Papers, Historical Society of Pennsylvania ( micro 14:0106).

Columbus, Nov. 30, 1860

"My dear x x x x,1

x x x x x x x x

Would to Heaven that it were in my power to compose the strife which now disturbs2 the peace of our country. Certainly there is, in my heart, no feeling but good will towards every part of it

But what can be done? I mean what can3 be done by a private citizen? If the Executive powers of the nation were in my hands I should know what to do. I would maintain the Union, support the Constitution, and enforce the laws.

And just here let me say that in the Commercial's' report of my Covington Speech (of which a copy directed to Mr. H-----'s address4 is mailed with this letter) a passage is left out which appears in the verbatim report of the Gazette.5 After stating, as my chief objection to the Bell- Everett Platform, that it proposed nothing which all parties did not agree to, &, therefore, was inadequate to the demand of the timer,6 I went on to say that what seemed to me the distinguishing characteristic of the party supporting Mr. Bell and also of the party supporting Mr. Douglas, in the South, was a true devotion to the Union & a resolute determination to sustain it, against the designs of disunion, entertained by a portion--though I hoped not a very large portion--of the supporters of Mr. Breckenridge:7--so that in the South, whatever might be the case in the North their platform did propose a practical

-37-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
The Salmon P. Chase Papers - Vol. 3
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 452

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.