The Salmon P. Chase Papers - Vol. 3

By John Niven; James P. McClure et al. | Go to book overview
noted--but not variations in spelling, punctuation, underlining, capitalization, word order, use of "&" for "and," or paragraph breaks.
Could in letterbook version.
Randall Hunt, Ruhamah Ludlow Hunt's husband, whose surname is spelled out in the letterbook copy. Jacob Schuckers, in his biography of Chase, printed this letter-- from the version in Chase's hand, not the letterbook--and, drawing freely on Plantz's filing endorsement, identified the recipient as "Mr. Randall Hunt, a Citizen of New Orleans." Jacob W. Schuckers, The Life and Public Services of Salmon Portland Chase ( New York, 1874), 199-201.
In correspondence with Charles A. Dana, November 10, 1860 (above), Chase referred to the version of his speech printed in the Cincinnati Commercial. The Cincinnati Daily Gazette published Chase's speech on November 2.
Actually, Constitutional Unionists led by John Bell and his running mate, Edward Everett, refused to draw up any platform, choosing instead to "recognize no policy or principles but those resting on tire broad foundation of the Constitution of the country, the Union of the States, and the enforcement of the laws." New York Daily Tribune, May 11, 1860.
John Cabell Breckinridge of Kentucky was the presidential candidate of southern Democrats. DAB, 3:8-9.
The word all is not in the letterbook version.
Letterbook version has the other.
Letterbook has should.
The letterbook version is lacking the word can in the phrase can only breed, and the word by in the phrase by honest provision.
The words slavery is a and sight of are missing from the letterbook version. Insertion carets indicate that the clerk intended to add something at those points in the letterbook copy, but neglected to do so.
The letterbook has nearly all men for almost all men; any aggression for all aggression; and fully recognized for frankly recognized.
Followers of William Lloyd Garrison.
Where this version of the letter in Chase's hand has notion of what some people call, the clerk's letterbook copy has notion of its execution under what some people call.
Chase perhaps intended to imply, with these x's, that something had been omitted, but in the letterbook copy there is nothing between the paragraph ending hastily expressed and the closing (which in the letterbook is "Cordially yours").

TO GEORGE G. FOGG

Autograph letter. George G. Fogg Papers, New Hampshire Historical Society ( micro 14:0171).

Columbus, Dec. 1[5], 18601

My dear Fogg,

Your kind letter came duly, and if it did you any good you had my sympathy in your new detentions.2

Since you were here I have recd. several letters on the subject you talked about urging the same views you did3 & several of our most prominent Republicans have called on me to express the same convictions. I shall say no more than I have already said to you & let the thing take its course

I do not see what the relations between myself and Mr. Wade have to do with this or any other matter. The truth is I dont know what those relations are. That I do not think exactly of him as I did a year ago is true: but it will be his fault not mine if this changed opinion shall pre

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