The Salmon P. Chase Papers - Vol. 3

By John Niven; James P. McClure et al. | Go to book overview
feel sure that we could by having a proper understanding with yourself greatly help you in the management of your vast negotiations--at the same time if we could not thus prove our value to you we should not expect your continued influence & favor--, You have to raise hundreds of millions-- A fund of at least 1/4th of one per cent should be placed at yr discretion for the purpose of carrying out such plans as cannot fail to save the Government (in our estimation) ten times that amount & perhaps much more besides insuring prompt success.-- We have such plans (digested) as could not fail to carry you through triumphantly / we could not be expected to leave our comfortable homes & positions here without some great inducement & we state frankly that we would if we succeeded expect a fair commission from the Treasury in some shape--for our labor & talent-- If you feel disposed to say to us, if our plans commend themselves fully to your judgement that you will give us the management of the Loans to be issued by the Government during the war allowing us a fair commission on them subject of course & entirely to your supervision & advice we are ready to throw ourselves into the matter heartily & at once --& will go down & have an interview with you explain our plans & if encouraged by you go to work at once --Very Respy JAY COOKE
1. Anthony Joseph Drexel ( 1826-93) directed the Philadelphia banking firm founded by his father in 1838. Cooke dropped plans for the venture with Drexel, but opened his own establishment in Washington, D.C., in February 1862. DAB, 5:456-57; Henrietta M. Larson, Jay Cooke, Private Banker ( Cambridge, Mass., 1936), 110, 113.
2. Possibly Paul D. Reed, a New York broker. New York Dir. (1863), 118.
3. Hery D. Cooke.

FROM GREEN ADAMS

Autograph letter. Chase Papers, Historical Society, of Pennsylvania (micro 16:0157).

Barbourville Ky July 16th 1861

Dear Governor

I reached home two days since haveing traveled slowly with a view to feel public sentiment.-- In some of the counties, & particularly in Madison county in this district, I find more disloyal feeling than I had supposed

In passing, I learned that a great many of the leading disunionists of the State, had left and were leaveing in small squads for Tennessee & Virginia, which created a suspicion among the Union men that their object was to bring a Southern force into the state before the August election.-- I however have no such fears

James B. Clay & his company started this road to Cumberland Gap;1 but when they got nearly to London, they learned that the boys at this

-77-

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